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           Search results for: AV-951 (Tivozanib) Mechanisms: VEGFR inhibitor   

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#27562627   2016/09/13 Save this To Up

Cyclic tensile strain promotes the osteogenic differentiation of a bone marrow stromal cell and vascular endothelial cell co-culture system.

Mechanical stimuli and neovascularization are closely coupled to osteogenic differentiation and new bone formation. The purpose of present study was to detect the effect of cyclic mechanical strain on a co-culture system of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and to clarify the related mechanisms. Primary BMSCs and VECs were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats and co-cultured at various ratios (1:0, 1:2, 1:4, 4:1, 2:1, 1:1, and 0:1). To determine optimized loading conditions, the cells were then subjected to various cyclic tensile strains (0%, 3%, 6% and 9%) using a Flexcell 5000 mechanical loading system. A protocol of 6% strain on the co-cultured cells at a 1:1 ratio was selected as the optimized culture conditions based on the best osteogenic effects, which included increased ALP activity, matrix mineralization and the expressions of VEGF, Runx-2 and Col-1. The VEGF-R inhibitor tivozanib was used to analyze the paracrine role of VEGF, and the osteogenesis-promoting effects of 6% tensile strain were abrogated in the co-cultured cells treated with tivozanib. These results demonstrate that cyclic tensile strain promotes osteogenic differentiation in BMSC/VEC co-culture systems, possibly via a VEC-mediated paracrine effect of VEGF on BMSCs.

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#27341596   2016/06/25 Save this To Up

Targeting Angiogenesis in Colorectal Cancer: Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

Colorectal cancer is commonly diagnosed throughout the world, and treatment options have greatly expanded over the last 2 decades. Targeting angiogenesis has been a major focus of study in a variety of malignancy types. Targeting angiogenesis has been achieved by several mechanisms in colorectal cancer, including use of antiangiogenic small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). There have been many attempts and failures to prove efficacy of TKIs in the treatment of colorectal cancer including sorafenib, sunitinib, vatalanib, and tivozanib. Regorafenib was the first TKI to demonstrate efficacy and is an orally active inhibitor of angiogenic (including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3), stromal, and oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases. There are ongoing investigations of both regorafenib and ninetanib; however, there remains a critical need to better understand novel combinations with TKIs that could prove more efficacious than available options.

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