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#28946310   2017/09/26 Save this To Up

Resistant starch type V formation in brown lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) starch with different lipids/fatty acids.

This study aimed to characterize the brown lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) starch and investigate the formation of amylose-lipid complexes (Resistant Starch Type V) by the addition of different lipids/fatty acids (10%, w/w) to both raw and cooked starch samples. Resistant starch content (measured by the official method of AACCI (Method 32-40), using the resistant starch assay kit) of raw brown lentil starch (BLS) increased significantly by the additions of lipids/fatty acids, starch sample complexed with HSO (hydrogenated sunflower oil) (14.1±0.4%) being the highest. For the cooked starch/lipid complexes, more profound effect was evident (22.2-67.7%). Peak, breakdown and trough viscosity values of the amylose-lipid complexed starches were significantly lower than that of BLS (p<0.05), while significant decreases in the setback and final viscosities were only detected in oil samples, but not in fatty acids. Each lipid in concern exerted different effects on the digestibility of starch and amylose-lipid complex formation while having no substantial differential effects on the thermal properties of starch depicted by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Amylose-lipid complex formation with suitable fatty acids/lipids seems a promising way of increasing resistant starch content of food formulations. Although the applications being quite uncommon yet, brown lentil seems to have potential both as a starch and also as a resistant starch source.

2491 related Products with: Resistant starch type V formation in brown lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) starch with different lipids/fatty acids.

Triglyceride Assay Kit Li Native Parainfluenza Viru Native Parainfluenza Viru Native Parainfluenza Viru Native Parainfluenza Viru Native Parainfluenza Viru Native Parainfluenza Viru Native Parainfluenza Viru Native Parainfluenza Viru Native Parainfluenza Viru Goat Anti-Rat Collagen, t pCAMBIA0105.1R Vector, (G

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#28335393   2017/03/24 Save this To Up

Solvent Retention Capacities of Oat Flour.

This study measured the solvent retention capacities (SRCs) of flours from eight oat varieties and one wheat variety against different solvents to explore the swelling volume of oat flour with different solvents, and thus provide a theoretical basis for quick β-glucan analysis. The SRC profile consists of water SRC (WSRC), 50% sucrose SRC (SSRC), 5% lactic acid SRC (LASRC), 5% Na₂CO₃ SRC (SCASRC), NaCl SRC (SCSRC), CaCl₂ SRC (CCSRC), FeCl₃ SRC (FCSRC), sodium cholate SRC (SCHSRC), NaOH (pH 10) SRC (SHSRC), Na₂CO₃ (pH 10) SRC (SCABSRC) and SDS (pH 10) SRC (SDSSRC) values, and a Chopin SRC kit was used to measure the SRC value. SRCs of the oat flours increased when the solvents turned from neutral (water and NaCl) to acidic (5% lactic acid) or alkaline (5% Na₂CO₃, CaCl₂, FeCl₃, NaOH and pH 10 Na₂CO₃), and rose as the metal ion valencies of the metal salts (NaCl, CaCl₂ and FeCl₃) increased. The β-glucan contents were significantly positively correlated with the SCSRC (0.83**), CCSRC (0.82**), SCHSRC (0.80**) and FCSRC (0.78*). SRC measurements of β-glucan in oat flours revealed that the CCSRC values were related with β-glucan (0.64*) but not related with protein and starch. CaCl₂ could therefore potentially be exploited as a reagent for β-glucan assay.

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100 µl Barrier Tip, Filt Solvent yellow 7 (4 Pheny Ofloxacin CAS Number [824

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#28290279   2017/03/14 Save this To Up

Storage related changes of cell wall based dietary fiber components of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) stems.

Storage related changes in the cell wall composition potentially affect the texture of plant-based foods and the physiological effects of cell wall based dietary fiber components. Therefore, a detailed characterization of cell wall polysaccharides and lignins from broccoli stems was performed. Freshly harvested broccoli and broccoli stored at 20°C and 1°C for different periods of time were analyzed. Effects on dietary fiber contents, polysaccharide composition, and on lignin contents/composition were much more pronounced during storage at 20°C than at 1°C. During storage, insoluble dietary fiber contents of broccoli stems increased up to 13%. Storage related polysaccharide modifications include an increase of the portions of cellulose, xylans, and homogalacturonans and a decrease of the neutral pectic side-chains arabinans and galactans. Broccoli stem lignins are generally rich in guaiacyl units. Lignins from freshly harvested broccoli stems contain slightly larger amounts of p-hydroxyphenyl units than syringyl units. Syringyl units are predominantly incorporated into the lignin polymers during storage, resulting in increased acetyl bromide soluble lignin contents. NMR-based analysis of the interunit linkage types of broccoli stem lignins revealed comparably large portions of resinol structures for a guaiacyl rich lignin. Incorporation of syringyl units into the polymers over storage predominantly occurs through β-O-4-linkages.

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Human Phospho-EGFR (Activ Human Mouse Rat Phospho-E Human Phospho-EGFR (Y1068 Human Mouse Rat Phospho-E Human Mouse Rat Phospho-E Human Mouse Rat Phospho-E Human Mouse Rat JNK (T183 Human Mouse Rat Phospho-p Human Mouse Rat Phospho-S Human Mouse Phospho-Stat Human Mouse Rat Phospho-S Human Mouse Phospho-Stat

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#27874272   2016/11/22 Save this To Up

Catalytic Transesterification of Starch with Plant Oils: A Sustainable and Efficient Route to Fatty Acid Starch Esters.

The transesterification of maize starch with olive oil or high oleic sunflower oil was studied under homogeneous conditions in the presence of 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene (TBD) as catalyst. Most importantly, this method used two renewable resources directly, without any pretreatment or derivatization, for the synthesis of polymeric materials with desirable properties. Moreover, the solvent, oils, and catalyst could be recovered through facile work-up and reused for further modifications. The obtained fatty acid starch esters (FASEs) were highly soluble in common organic solvents and were thoroughly characterized. Degrees of substitution (DS) were calculated using (31) P NMR spectroscopy, and DS values of approximately 1.3 were obtained. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis revealed thermal transitions of the modified starches at approximately 80-90 °C. Films were produced from these FASEs, and their hydrophobic surfaces were characterized using contact-angle measurements. Furthermore, mechanical properties were examined using tensile strength measurements and showed approximately 40 and 80 % elongation at break for modified maize starch and modified amylose from maize, respectively.

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#27283705   2016/06/10 Save this To Up

A simple microplate-based method for the determination of α-amylase activity using the glucose assay kit (GOD method).

For the first time, a reliable, simple, rapid and high-throughput analytical method for the detection and quantification of α-amylase inhibitory activity using the glucose assay kit was developed. The new method facilitates rapid screening of a large number of samples, reduces labor, time and reagents and is also suitable for kinetic studies. This method is based on the reaction of maltose with glucose oxidase (GOD) and the development of a red quinone. The test is done in microtitre plates with a total volume of 260μL and an assay time of 40min including the pre-incubation steps. The new method is tested for linearity, sensitivity, precision, reproducibility and applicability. The new method is also compared with the most commonly used 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (DNSA) method for determining α-amylase activity.

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QuantiChrom™ α-Amylase QuantiChrom™ LDH Cytoto QuantiChrom™ Acetylchol QuantiChrom™ Formaldehy EnzyChrom™ Kinase Assay EnzyChrom™ Phospholipas QuantiChrom™ Nitric Oxi QuantiChrom™ BCP Albumi QuantiChrom™ BCP Albumi QuantiChrom™ Calcium As QuantiChrom™ Urea Assay EnzyChrom™ NAD NADH Ass

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#26212779   2016/07/13 Save this To Up

Comparison of Four Saliva Detection Methods to Identify Expectorated Blood Spatter.

Blood spatter analysis is an important step for crime scene reconstruction. The presence of saliva in blood spatter could indicate expectorated blood which is difficult to distinguish from impact spatter. In this study, four saliva test methods (SALIgAE(®) , Phadebas(®) sheet, RSID(™) -Saliva kit, and starch gel diffusion) were compared to identify the best method for detecting expectorated blood spatter. The RSID(™) -Saliva kit showed the highest sensitivity even when saliva was mixed with blood, and was not inhibited by the presence of blood. The SALIgAE(®) test provided easy and rapid results, but the yellow color of a positive reaction was overwhelmed by the red color of the blood. The starch gel diffusion method and the Phadebas(®) sheet exhibited relatively low sensitivity and the assay took a long time. When using the RSID(™) -Saliva kit for identifying saliva in blood, results should be read within 10 min.

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EnzyChrom™ Acetylcholin EnzyChrom™ Ascorbic Aci EnzyChrom™ Catalase Ass EnzyChrom™ Lactose Assa EnzyChrom™ Pyruvate Ass AccuzolTM Total RNA Extra MarkerGeneTM Carbohydrate  EpiQuik Total Histone H  EpiQuik Total Histone H  EpiQuik Total Histone H  EpiQuik Total Histone H Topoisomerase II; Clone

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#25907330   2015/07/27 Save this To Up

Biochemical, structural and functional diversity between two digestive α-amylases from Helicoverpa armigera.

Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera) feeds on various plants using diverse digestive enzymes as one of the survival tool-kit. The aim of the present study was to understand biochemical properties of recombinant α-amylases of H. armigera viz., HaAmy1 and HaAmy2.

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Twort's Counterstain Kit Androgen Receptor (Phosph Androgen Receptor (Phosph Rabbit Anti-Human Androge Rabbit Anti-Human Androge Androgen Receptor (Ab 650 AZD-3514 Mechanisms: Andr 17β-Acetoxy-2α-bromo-5 (5α,16β)-N-Acetyl-16-[2 (5α,16β)-N-Acetyl-16-ac 5α-N-Acetyl-2'H-androst- 5α-N-Acetyl-2'H-androst-

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#25902990   2015/04/23 Save this To Up

Improved AOAC First Action 2011.08 for the Analysis of Vitamin B₁₂ in Infant Formula and Adult/Pediatric Formulas: First Action 2014.02.

This report documents improvement and single-laboratory validation performed on AOAC First Action Method 2011.08 for vitamin B12 in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula. The original validation study included a range of fortified products, from infant formulas to breakfast cereals or beverages. Extended validation data, including additional infant formulas and adult/pediatric nutritionals, has now been produced. In addition, the method has been modified to use ultra-HPLC and the calibration range extended in a multilevel calibration curve. Detection and quantification limits were also improved by increasing the sample weight used for analysis and the reconstitution rate adapted to the requirements. The Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals Test Material Kit, designed to represent a large range of products within the category (infant formula and adult nutritionals made from any combination of milk, soy, rice, whey, hydrolyzed protein, starch, and amino acids, with and without intact protein), was used to determine performance characteristics of the method. The modifications included allow now full compliance with standard method performance requirements established for vitamin B12 (SMPR 2011.005). LOQ was ≤0.01 μg/100 g, working range between 0.01 and 5.0 μg/100 g, repeatability ≤7%, and recovery in the range 90-110%. The method was granted AOAC First Action status 2014.02.

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#24614734   2014/03/11 Save this To Up

Quantitative analysis of D-(+)-glucose in fruit juices using diffusion ordered-1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

This study works on D-(+)-glucose quantitative analysis using diffusion ordered-quantitative (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (DOSY-qNMR), by which an analyte could be distinguished from interferences based upon a characteristic diffusion coefficient (D) in gradient magnetic fields. The D value of D-(+)-glucose in deuterium oxide at 30°C was 5.6 × 10(-10) m(2)/s at a field gradient pulse of between 5.0 × 10(-2) and 3.0 × 10(-1) T/m, distinguished from fructose, sucrose and starch. Good linearity (r(2) = 0.9998) was obtained between D-(+)-glucose (0.5-20.0 g/L) and the ratio of the resonance area of α-C1 proton (5.21 ppm) in D-(+)-glucose to that of the β-C1 proton (5.25 ppm) in D-glucuronic acid (50.0 g/L) as an internal standard. The DOSY-qNMR method was successfully applied to quantify D-(+)-glucose in orange juice (18.3 ± 1.0 g/L), apple juice (26.3 ± 0.4 g/L) and grape juice (45.6 ± 0.6 g/L); the values agreed well with a conventional F-kit glucose method.

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GLP 1 ELISA Kit, Rat Gluc N-Acetyl-2-O-(5-bromo-1H- 1-Acetyl-2,3-dihydro-2-me 1-Acetyl-2,3-dihydro-2-me (S)-N-[2-[7-Allyl-5-bromo (S)-N-[2-[7-Allyl-5-bromo (S)-N-[2-[6-Allyloxy-5-br 3-(2-Aminoethyl)-N-methyl Insulin Glucose Phospho-S Nuclear Membrane Receptor Inflammation (Human) Quan Inflammation (Human) Quan

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#24243190   2013/11/18 Save this To Up

DNA extraction from vegetative tissue for next-generation sequencing.

The quality of extracted DNA is crucial for several applications in molecular biology. If the DNA is to be used for next-generation sequencing (NGS), then microgram quantities of good-quality DNA is required. In addition, the DNA must substantially be of high molecular weight so that it can be used for library preparation and NGS sequencing. Contaminating phenol or starch in the isolated DNA can be easily removed by filtration through kit-based cartridges. In this chapter we describe a simple two-reagent DNA extraction protocol which yields a high quality and quantity of DNA which can be used for different applications including NGS.

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