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#27667446   2016/09/26 Save this To Up

Oxidized LDL, statin use, morbidity, and mortality in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis.

Statin treatment reduces the risk of cardiovascular mortality in the general population, but it has little or no benefit in hemodialyzed (HD) patients. This may reflect different underlying pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients treated with HD, maybe involving the oxidative stress. Our aim was to assess the association of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), determined by Mercodia oxLDL enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, with major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and all-cause mortality in HD patients based on the AURORA trial (rosuvastatin vs placebo), and patients not on HD from the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) study. We also assessed whether its decrease due to statin use improves these outcomes using Cox proportional hazard models. Baseline oxLDL level was 34.2 ± 13.8 U/L in AURORA and did not differ between treatment groups, and 74.6 ± 28.1 U/L in LURIC. Lower baseline oxLDL levels were associated with higher hazard ratios (HRs) for outcomes, but not anymore after adjusting for apolipoprotein B level in AURORA and was not related to mortality in LURIC. OxLDL levels decreased by 30.9% between baseline and 3 months in the statin-treated group and increased by 10.5% between 3 and 12 months. Nevertheless, oxLDL reduction was not significantly associated with adjusted HRs for MACE and for all-cause mortality. These results showed no association between oxLDL and MACE after adjustment on apolipoprotein B, which may relate to the properties of the method used for oxLDL. Our results also showed no benefit for oxLDL reduction by rosuvastatin on outcomes. Future clinical trials are needed to define the relative CVD risks and benefits of other modalities of oxidative stress modification in this population.

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Native Human LDL, Oxidize Rabbit Anti-Oxidized LDL Interleukin-34 IL34 (N-t Interleukin-34 IL34 anti Sterile filtered goat se Sterile filtered goat se Sterile filtered mouse s Sterile filtered rat ser ING1B antisense ING1B sense Interferon γ p19 INK4D

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#24342929   2014/03/05 Save this To Up

Apparently "low" serum asymmetric dimethylarginine is associated with fasting glucose and tends toward association with type-2 diabetes.

We investigated the association of serum asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) with metabolic syndrome (MetS), type-2 diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD) in the general population.

2019 related Products with: Apparently "low" serum asymmetric dimethylarginine is associated with fasting glucose and tends toward association with type-2 diabetes.

(3S,4aS,8aS)-2-[(2R,3R)-3 L allo Isoleucine CAS Num Interleukin-34 IL34 (N-t Interleukin-34 IL34 anti 4-Amino α-Carboline C11H 5-Amino-3-(1-naphthyl)-4- 3-sec-Amylphenyl N-Methyl rac-1-Anthracen-2-yl-etha L-Azetidine-2-carboxylic 1-(6-Benzofuranyl)-2-prop PERMANENT AQUEOUS MOUNTIN Bovine Androstenedione,AS

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#10803663   2000/07/20 Save this To Up

Plasma lipoprotein(a) distribution and its correlates among Samoans.

Plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)]-consisting of a disulfide-linked complex of apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein (a)--levels are considered to be an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. There are considerable ethnic group differences in the distribution of plasma Lp(a) levels that raise public health concerns. Although plasma Lp(a) distribution has been determined in various ethnic groups, no such information is available in Pacific Islanders. In this study we have determined the distribution and correlates of plasma Lp(a) in population-based samples of 361 American Samoans (145 men, 216 women) and 560 Western Samoans (265 men, 295 women), aged 20-70 years. Plasma Lp(a) levels were measured using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The distribution of plasma Lp(a) levels in both groups was highly skewed with 73% and 65% of values in the 0-5 mg/dl range in American Samoans and Western Samoans, respectively. The mean (6.4 mg/dl) and median (2.2 mg/dl) Lp(a) levels in pooled Samoans were significantly lower when compared with other ethnic groups using the same measurement kit. Plasma Lp(a) correlated significantly with total and LDL cholesterol in both genders after correcting for the contribution of Lp(a) cholesterol, and with apolipoprotein B in women after the correction for Lp(a)-apoB, but not with age, smoking, alcohol intake, or body mass index. Our data show that Samoans, Polynesians of Pacific Islands, have strikingly lower Lp(a) levels than all other reported population groups. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that genetic factors account for interethnic group variation in plasma Lp(a) levels.

1270 related Products with: Plasma lipoprotein(a) distribution and its correlates among Samoans.

Lipoprotein a [Lp(a)], Hu Lipoprotein, Human Plasma Bovine Androstenedione,AS Non-sterile bovine plasm Non-sterile bovine plasm Non-sterile Cynomolgus m Non-sterile Cynomolgus m Non-sterile Cynomolgus m Non-sterile Cynomolgus m Non-sterile Cynomolgus m Non-sterile Cynomolgus m Non-sterile Cynomolgus m

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#9681593   1998/10/06 Save this To Up

Mechanized lipoprotein(a) assay as a marker for coronary artery disease illustrates the usefulness of high lipoprotein(a) levels.

Only a few simple lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] assays are available in kit form for use in clinical laboratories. The present study compares the analytical and clinical performance of a mechanized immunonephelometric method to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Clinical performance was evaluated by measuring lipoprotein markers in 191 patients, with the extent of stenosis defined by angiography. Analytically, both methods showed little or no correlation with cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, apo A-I and apo B, while they showed good agreement with one another (r = 0.88). The methods showed comparable well known differences between black and white persons. Logistic regression indicated that Lp(a) was a weak but independent marker for coronary artery disease (CAD). Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed an association with CAD only at higher Lp(a) concentrations. We conclude that Lp(a) at higher concentrations may be a contributory marker for CAD and that mechanized nephelometric assays for it can be used in the clinical laboratory.

1887 related Products with: Mechanized lipoprotein(a) assay as a marker for coronary artery disease illustrates the usefulness of high lipoprotein(a) levels.

MarkerGeneTM Fluorescent MarkerGene™ LysoLive™ MarkerGene™ Cellular Se MarkerGene™ Multiple Dr Glucose Assay With the La Cultrex In Vitro Angiogen ENZYMATIC ASSAY KITS (CH ENZYMATIC ASSAY KITS (CH ENZYMATIC ASSAY KITS (CH ENZYMATIC ASSAY KITS (CH Rabbit Anti-HDL high dens Rabbit Anti-HDL high dens

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#1387818   1992/10/15 Save this To Up

Automated measurement of lipoprotein(a) by immunoturbidimetric analysis.

Immunoturbidimetric analysis of lipoprotein(a) in plasma or serum was developed for use on the Roche COBAS FARA II and COBAS MIRA clinical chemistry analyzers. The components of the assay are: (1) buffer consisting of 2.25% polyethylene glycol in phosphate-buffered saline, 0.2% gelatin, and a surfactant; (2) fractionated goat anti-human lipoprotein(a) IgG; (3) five standards with lipoprotein(a) concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 1.0 g/l; (4) two controls with concentrations of approximately 0.2 and 0.5 g/l. The analyzer delivers sample and buffer, incubates the reaction mixture at 37 degrees C for 5 min, delivers neat lipoprotein(a) antibody, and incubates for an additional 10 min. The lipoprotein(a) concentration of samples is calculated by the COBAS DENS (Data Evaluation for Non-linear Standard Curves) option by fitting the standard curve values to a four-parameter logit-log curve model. Total imprecision results (CV%) for the FARA II and MIRA were under 11% (NCCLS protocol EP5-T). The assay is linear beyond the highest calibrator to 2.6 g/l. No interference was observed for plasminogen up to 2.3 g/l, apolipoprotein B up to 4.36 g/l, hemoglobin up to 10 g/l, bilirubin up to 4.0 g/l, and triglycerides up to 4.36 g/l. Comparison with a double monoclonal ELISA used at the Northwest Lipid Research Laboratories yielded: R = 0.970, slope = 1.013, and y-intercept = 0.00009 (n = 37). Comparison with a commercially available ELISA kit for lipoprotein(a) yielded: r = 0.987, slope = 1.243, and y-intercept = 0.024 (n = 40). This assay provides rapid, accurate, and precise screening of lipoprotein(a) in serum or plasma.

2598 related Products with: Automated measurement of lipoprotein(a) by immunoturbidimetric analysis.

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#2116943   1990/09/18 Save this To Up

International study on the comparability of Apo A-1 and Apo B methods.

Apo A-1 and Apo B levels have become increasingly important as a mean of assessing risk and susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases. These proteins are measured routinely in numerous clinical and research laboratories due primarily to the ability to mechanise the immunological assay method and to the ready availability of commercially produced antisera and standards which are often sold in kit form. However, if these variables are to be used to assess the clinical risk of disease reliably, the test methods should have a low degree of imprecision and inaccuracy, to reduce false positive and negative results. The 'normal' and 'pathological' ranges for both proteins also need to be clearly defined. In order to be able to define clinical ranges and establish quality control limits on both a national and international level the inaccuracy and imprecision of the different methods used to assay the parameters need to be established. Since the technical expertise and the equipment and reagents used vary between laboratories, and because there is no internationally recognized calibration material, a survey conducted to establish imprecision and inaccuracy must include many laboratories to take these variations into account. At the WHO Collaborating Lipid Reference Centre, The Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine in Prague, Czechoslovakia, we have been involved in the external quality control programme for cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol and thiocyanate methods for more than 15 yr. Although the Centre was originally created as a European Reference Centre, laboratories participating in our quality control scheme now come from Asia, the USA and New Zealand as well as Europe due to their involvement in the large scale population studies like 'MONICA', 'ERICA' and 'CINDI'. In addition we also cooperate with some laboratories expected to join WHO projects and with others running either national or their own research programmes. Due to the increasing need to learn more about the methods used for Apo A-1 and Apo B assays in both research and preventive schemes for cardiovascular diseases, we decided, following the combined IUIS and NHLBI-CDC Apolipoprotein standardization surveys, to arrange for an international survey to determine the precision and relative accuracy of EIA, ELISA, INA, TURB and RID methods. Our survey originally intended to include only European laboratories but the number of participants increased (Table I) and we believe it supplies complementary information to the IUIS-NHLBI-CDC surveys because both research and routine clinical laboratories were included in our survey.

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