Only in Titles

           Search results for: Human Dermal Lymphatic Microvascular Endothelial Cells   

paperclip

#31394409   // Save this To Up

Characterization of de novo lytic infection of dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

The biology of primary lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection is still not well understood, which is largely attributed to the lack of cell lines permissive to robust lytic KSHV infection in vitro. Our study demonstrates that primary human dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (HDLMEC) support lytic KSHV replication following de novo infection, resulting in robust KSHV production, indicating that HDLMECs are suitable for studying the regulation of primary lytic KSHV infection. Importantly, by utilizing lytically infected HDLMECs, we show for the first time that the KSHV latent genes LANA and viral cyclin are required for lytic replication during de novo lytic infection, a function of these latent genes that has not yet been recognized. Since Kaposi's sarcoma is considered to be originated from infected lymphatic endothelial cells, HDLMECs represent a valuable in vitro cell culture model for investigating lytic KSHV infection, which has been understudied in KSHV pathogenesis.

2303 related Products with: Characterization of de novo lytic infection of dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

Human Dermal Lymphatic Mi GFP Expressing Human Derm Human Dermal Microvascula RFP Expressing Human Live Human Synovial Microvascu GFP Expressing Human Live Human Small Intestine Mic Human Liver Sinusoidal Mi Human Brain Microvascular MarkerGene™ Cellular Se GFP Expressing Human Reti Human Ovarian Microvascul

Related Pathways

  •  
  • No related Items
paperclip

#30242766   // Save this To Up

Isolation of Human Skin Lymphatic Endothelial Cells and 3D Reconstruction of the Lymphatic Vasculature In Vitro.

Studies of lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic endothelial biology in vitro require pure cultures of lymphatic endothelial cells and 3D vascular constructs, which closely resemble native human lymphatic vasculature. We describe a method for the isolation of human dermal microvascular lymphatic endothelial cells and generation of a 3D lymphatic capillary network. The lymphatic vascular construct is generated by coculturing primary lymphatic endothelial cells and fibroblasts in their native matrix, without the use of synthetic scaffolds or exogenous factors. The tissue is stable over many weeks and accurately recapitulates features of human dermal lymphatic microvasculature.

1325 related Products with: Isolation of Human Skin Lymphatic Endothelial Cells and 3D Reconstruction of the Lymphatic Vasculature In Vitro.

GFP Expressing Human Derm Human Dermal Lymphatic Mi GFP Expressing Human Inte Human Small Intestine Mic Human Internal Mammary Ar Human Large Intestine Mic RFP Expressing Human Umbi Human Dermal Microvascula Human Retinal Microvascul Human Prostate Microvascu RFP Expressing Human Saph GFP Expressing Human Umbi

Related Pathways

paperclip

#29629844   // Save this To Up

Aspirin suppresses components of lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic vessel remodeling by inhibiting the NF-κB/VCAM-1 pathway in human lymphatic endothelial cells.

Lymphangiogenesis is the process of new vessel formation from pre-existing lymphatic vessels. The process mainly involves cell adhesion, migration, and tubule formation of lymphatic endothelial cells. Tumor-induced lymphangiogenesis is an important factor contributing to promotion of tumor growth and cancer metastasis via the lymphatic system. Finding the non-toxic agents that can prevent or inhibit lymphangiogenesis may lead to blocking of lymphatic metastasis. Recently, aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has been reported to inhibit in vivo lymphangiogenesis in tumor and incision wound models, but the mechanisms of actions of aspirin on anti-lymphangiogenesis have been less explored. In this study, we aim to explore the mechanism underlying the anti-lymphangiogenic effects of aspirin in primary human dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial (HMVEC-dLy) cells in vitro. Pretreatment of aspirin at non-toxic dose 0.3 mM significantly suppressed in vitro cord formation, adhesion, and the migration abilities of the HMVEC-dLy cells. Western blotting analysis indicated that aspirin decreased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), at both protein and mRNA levels, and these correlated with the reduction of NF-κB p65 phosphorylation. By using NF-κB inhibitor (BAY-11-7085) and VCAM-1 siRNA, we showed that VCAM-1 expression is downstream of NF-κB activation, and this NF-κB/VCAM-1 signaling pathway controls cord formation, adhesion, and the migration abilities of the HMVEC-dLy cells. In summary, we demonstrate the potential of aspirin as an anti-lymphangiogenic agent, and elucidate its mechanism of action.

1238 related Products with: Aspirin suppresses components of lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic vessel remodeling by inhibiting the NF-κB/VCAM-1 pathway in human lymphatic endothelial cells.

Human Dermal Lymphatic Mi GFP Expressing Human Derm Human Large Intestine Mic Lymphatic vessel endothel GFP Expressing Human Inte Human Small Intestine Mic Human Internal Mammary Ar glial cells missing homol Integrin alpha6 antibody Anti human C1 Esterase In Goat Anti-Human Endotheli Mouse Anti-Human Endothel

Related Pathways

paperclip

#29509435   // Save this To Up

Insulin uptake and action in microvascular endothelial cells of lymphatic and blood origin.

Whereas the blood microvasculature constitutes a biological barrier to the action of blood-borne insulin on target tissues, the lymphatic microvasculature might act as a barrier to subcutaneously administrated insulin reaching the circulation. Here, we evaluate the interaction of insulin with primary microvascular endothelial cells of lymphatic [human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells (HDLEC)] and blood [human adipose microvascular endothelial cells (HAMEC)] origin, derived from human dermal and adipose tissues, respectively. HDLEC express higher levels of insulin receptor and signal in response to insulin as low as 2.5 nM, while HAMEC only activate signaling at 100 nM (a dose that blood vessels do not normally encounter). Low insulin acts specifically through the insulin receptor, while supraphysiological insulin acts through both the IR and insulin growth factor-1 receptor. At supraphysiological or injection site-compatible doses pertinent to lymphatic microvessels, insulin enters HAMEC and HDLEC via fluid-phase endocytosis. Conversely, at physiologically circulating doses (0.2 nM) pertinent to blood microvessels, insulin enters HAMEC through a receptor-mediated process requiring IR autophosphorylation but not downstream insulin signaling. At physiological doses, internalized insulin is barely degraded and is instead released intact to the extracellular medium. In conclusion, we document for the first time the mechanism of interaction of insulin with lymphatic endothelial cells, which may be relevant to insulin absorption during therapeutic injections. Furthermore, we describe distinct action and uptake routes for insulin at physiological and supraphysiological doses in blood microvascular endothelial cells, providing a potential explanation for previously conflicting studies on endothelial insulin uptake.

2156 related Products with: Insulin uptake and action in microvascular endothelial cells of lymphatic and blood origin.

Human Dermal Lymphatic Mi Human Small Intestine Mic GFP Expressing Human Derm Human Large Intestine Mic GFP Expressing Human Glom Human Retinal Microvascul Human Prostate Microvascu GFP Expressing Mouse Brai GFP Expressing Human Live GFP Expressing Human Inte Human Cord Blood CD34+ Ce Human Dermal Microvascula

Related Pathways

paperclip

#29427637   // Save this To Up

CEACAM1 resists hypoxia-induced inhibition of tube formation of human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells.

Tube formation is one of the fundamental events required by angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. To date, there is little knowledge on the effects of hypoxia on tube formation of human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells (HDLECs). In this study, we found that tube formation of HDLECs was inhibited under hypoxic condition with decreased expressions of VEGF-D, CEACAM1 and Prox1 genes. However, hypoxia-induced inhibition of tube formation of HDLECs was reversed by conditional media from hypoxic tumor cells. After knockdown of CEACAM1 by siRNA transfection, tube formation of HDLECs was increased with elevated Prox1 expression, suggesting that CEACAM1 downregulates Prox1 and plays an inhibitory role in tube formation of HDLECs. Since the expressions of CEACAM1 and Prox1 were both decreased by hypoxia, there are additional mechanisms downregulating Prox1 expressions during hypoxia-inhibited tube formation of HDLECs.

1871 related Products with: CEACAM1 resists hypoxia-induced inhibition of tube formation of human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells.

GFP Expressing Human Derm Human Dermal Lymphatic Mi Human Dermal Microvascula Human Cord Blood CD34+ Ce GFP Expressing Human Umbi Human Glomerular Microvas GFP Expressing Human Live GFP Expressing Human Inte Endothelial Tube Formatio GFP Expressing Human Brai Mouse Anti-Human Endothel GFP Expressing Human Aort

Related Pathways

paperclip

#28742689   // Save this To Up

Lymphangiogenic Gene Expression Is Associated With Lymph Node Recurrence and Poor Prognosis After Partial Hepatectomy for Colorectal Liver Metastasis.

To investigate the relevance of lymphangiogenic gene expression in primary and liver metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC) and identify determinants of lymphatic invasion.

2043 related Products with: Lymphangiogenic Gene Expression Is Associated With Lymph Node Recurrence and Poor Prognosis After Partial Hepatectomy for Colorectal Liver Metastasis.

Colorectal carcinoma and Colorectal (colon and rec Colorectal (colon and rec Tissue array of breast ca Tissue array of breast ca Stomach cancer with match Breast fibroadenoma tissu Lung cancer with matched Breast cancer tissue arra Ovary serous papillary ad Esophagus cancer with mat Colon cancer, metastasize

Related Pathways

paperclip

#28459049   // Save this To Up

Engineering Blood and Lymphatic Microvascular Networks in Fibrin Matrices.

Vascular network engineering is essential for nutrient delivery to tissue-engineered constructs and, consequently, their survival. In addition, the functionality of tissues also depends on tissue drainage and immune cell accessibility, which are the main functions of the lymphatic system. Engineering both the blood and lymphatic microvasculature would advance the survival and functionality of tissue-engineered constructs. The aim of this study was to isolate pure populations of lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) and blood vascular endothelial cells (BEC) from human dermal microvascular endothelial cells and to study their network formation in our previously described coculture model with adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC) in fibrin scaffolds. We could follow the network development over a period of 4 weeks by fluorescently labeling the cells. We show that LEC and BEC form separate networks, which are morphologically distinguishable and sustainable over several weeks. In addition, lymphatic network development was dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C, resulting in denser networks with increasing VEGF-C concentration. Finally, we confirm the necessity of cell-cell contact between endothelial cells and ASC for the formation of both blood and lymphatic microvascular networks. This model represents a valuable platform for drug testing and for the future studies on lymphatic and blood microvascularization.

2979 related Products with: Engineering Blood and Lymphatic Microvascular Networks in Fibrin Matrices.

Human Large Intestine Mic C Peptide ELISA Kit, Rat GFP Expressing Human Derm Human Small Intestine Mic Human Dermal Lymphatic Mi Anti beta3 AR Human, Poly Cynomolgus Whole Blood 10 Colon cancer tissue array Interstitialoma of gastro Thyroid cancer tissue arr Mouse Anti-Influenza-A HA Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)

Related Pathways

paperclip

#28448484   // Save this To Up

Tissue-engineered 3D human lymphatic microvascular network for in vitro studies of lymphangiogenesis.

This protocol describes a unique in vitro method for the generation of a 3D human lymphatic network within native connective tissue devoid of any exogenous material such as scaffolds or growth factors. In this five-stage protocol, human lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) cocultured with dermal fibroblasts spontaneously organize into a stable 3D lymphatic capillary network. Stage 1 involves the isolation of primary fibroblasts and LECs from human skin. Fibroblasts are then cultured to produce connective tissue rich in extracellular matrix (stage 2), onto which LECs are seeded to form a network (stage 3). After stacking of tissue layers and tissue maturation at the air-liquid interface (stage 4), the 3D construct containing the lymphatic microvascular network can be analyzed by microscopy (stage 5). Lymphatic vasculature generated by this approach exhibits the major cellular and ultrastructural features of native in vivo human dermal lymphatic microvasculature and is stable over many weeks. The protocol for generating a 3D construct takes 6 weeks to complete, and it requires experience in cell culture techniques. The system described here offers a unique opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying lymphatic vessel formation, remodeling and function in a human cell context.

2180 related Products with: Tissue-engineered 3D human lymphatic microvascular network for in vitro studies of lymphangiogenesis.

Human breast invasive duc Multiple organ tumor tiss In vitro Human Lymphangio Multiple organ tumor tiss Frozen multiple human org Inhibitory Mouse Monoclon Human Small Intestine Mic In vitro Human Brain Micr GFP Expressing Human Derm In vitro Human Glomerular Human normal bone and ost Breast invasive ductal ca

Related Pathways

paperclip

#27149683   // Save this To Up

Lymphatic endothelial cells actively regulate prostate cancer cell invasion.

Lymphatic vessels serve as the primary route for metastatic spread to lymph nodes. However, it is not clear how interactions between cancer cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), especially within hypoxic microenvironments, affect the invasion of cancer cells. Here, using an MR compatible cell perfusion assay, we investigated the role of LEC-prostate cancer (PCa) cell interaction in the invasion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by two human PCa cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145, under normoxia and hypoxia, and determined the metabolic changes that occurred under these conditions. We observed a significant increase in the invasion of ECM by invasive PC-3 cells, but not poorly invasive DU-145 cells when human dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-dlys) were present. Enhanced degradation of ECM by PC-3 cells in the presence of HMVEC-dlys identified interactions between HMVEC-dlys and PCa cells influencing cancer cell invasion. The enhanced ECM degradation was partly attributed to increased MMP-9 enzymatic activity in PC-3 cells when HMVEC-dlys were in close proximity. Significantly higher uPAR and MMP-9 expression levels observed in PC-3 cells compared to DU-145 cells may be one mechanism for increased invasion and degradation of matrigel by these cells irrespective of the presence of HMVEC-dlys. Hypoxia significantly decreased invasion by PC-3 cells, but this decrease was significantly attenuated when HMVEC-dlys were present. Significantly higher phosphocholine was observed in invasive PC-3 cells, while higher glycerophosphocholine was observed in DU-145 cells. These metabolites were not altered in the presence of HMVEC-dlys. Significantly increased lipid levels and lipid droplets were observed in PC-3 and DU-145 cells under hypoxia reflecting an adaptive survival response to oxidative stress. These results suggest that in vivo, invasive cells in or near lymphatic endothelial cells are likely to be more invasive and degrade the ECM to influence the metastatic cascade. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

2935 related Products with: Lymphatic endothelial cells actively regulate prostate cancer cell invasion.

GFP Expressing Human Derm Human Prostate Microvascu Human Dermal Lymphatic Mi Human Cardiac Microvascul GFP Expressing Mouse Brai RFP Expressing Human Umbi Human Dermal Microvascula RFP Expressing Human Reti Human Small Intestine Mic GFP Expressing Human Saph GFP Expressing Human Umbi Human Glomerular Microvas

Related Pathways

paperclip

#26527604   // Save this To Up

NUP160-SLC43A3 is a novel recurrent fusion oncogene in angiosarcoma.

Angiosarcoma is a malignant vascular tumor originating from endothelial cells of blood vessels or lymphatic vessels. The specific driver mutations in angiosarcoma remain unknown. In this study, we investigated this issue by transcriptome sequencing of patient-derived angiosarcoma cells (ISO-HAS), identifying a novel fusion gene NUP160-SLC43A3 found to be expressed in 9 of 25 human angiosarcoma specimens that were examined. In tumors harboring the fusion gene, the duration between the onset of symptoms and the first hospital visit was significantly shorter, suggesting more rapid tumor progression. Stable expression of the fusion gene in nontransformed human dermal microvascular endothelial cells elicited a gene-expression pattern mimicking ISO-HAS cells and increased cell proliferation, an effect traced in part to NUP160 truncation. Conversely, RNAi-mediated attenuation of NUP160 in ISO-HAS cells decreased cell number. Confirming the oncogenic effects of the fusion protein, subcutaneous implantation of NUP160-SLC43A3-expressing fibroblasts induced tumors resembling human angiosarcoma. Collectively, our findings advance knowledge concerning the genetic causes of angiosarcoma, with potential implications for new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

1368 related Products with: NUP160-SLC43A3 is a novel recurrent fusion oncogene in angiosarcoma.

Rabbit Anti-TNIP2 ABIN2 T Goat Anti- TRIM5 RNF88 (a Rabbit Anti-TNIP2 ABIN2 T Mouse Anti-Insulin(1G11) Rabbit Anti-G protein alp Rabbit Anti-APIP Apaf1 In Rabbit Anti-G protein alp Rabbit Anti-APIP Apaf1 In Anti AGO2 Mouse, Monoclon Rabbit Anti-NOS-2 iNOS Po Rabbit Anti-Phospho-INPPL Goat Anti-Human Nur77 TR3

Related Pathways