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Search results for: ARH LDL receptor adaptor

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#33994332   2021/04/29 To Up

Persistent hypercholesterolemia in child with homozygous autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia: A decade of lipid management.

Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) is a rare form of genetic hypercholesterolemia caused by mutations in low density lipoprotein receptor adaptor protein 1 (LDLRAP1). The proband first presented with linear eruptive xanthomas over her ankles, knees and elbows, with low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) of 16.0 mmol/L (618.7 mg/dL), at 2.5 years old. Next generation sequencing revealed a novel homozygous mutation in LDLRAP1 exon 5 (c.466delG). In the first year, drug regimens of either cholestyramine or simvastatin, reduced her LDL-C to 10.5 mmol/L (406 mg/dL) and 11.7 mmol/L (452.4 mg/dL), respectively. Combination simvastatin and ezetimibe was the mainstay of therapy from age 5 - 10 years. Her lowest achieved LDL-C was 6.3 mmol/L (243.6 mg/dL). Switching to atorvastatin did not lead to further reduction. Carotid intima-media thickness was 0.47 mm (> 97 percentile) and 0.32 mm (75 - 95 percentile) at ages 8 years and 11 years, respectively. Addition of monthly injections of evolocumab for 3 months, led to an increase in LDL-C, from 7.0 mmol/L (270.7 mg/dL) to a range of [(8.4 - 9.1) mmol/L or (324.8 - 351.9) mg/dL]. In this report, a decade-long lipid management is described in a patient with ARH. Residual activity of LDLRAP1 is a likely determinant of her response. Clinical management remains sub-optimal and options for the paediatric population are limited. Novel classes of cholesterol-lowering medications are needed for this ultra-rare and severe hypercholesterolemia.
Sharon Li Ting Pek, Fabian Yap, Aravind Venkatesh Sreedharan, Jonathan Tze Liang Choo, S Tavintharan

2046 related Products with: Persistent hypercholesterolemia in child with homozygous autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia: A decade of lipid management.

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#33938231   2021/06/08 To Up

Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells as a Model to Study Autosomal Recessive Hypercholesterolemia.

Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) is a rare monogenic disorder caused by pathogenic variants in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) adaptor protein 1 () gene, encoding for the LDLRAP1 protein, which impairs internalization of hepatic LDLR. There are variable responses of ARH patients to treatment and the pathophysiological mechanism(s) for this variability remains unclear. This is in part caused by absence of reliable cellular models to evaluate the effect of mutations on the LDLRAP1 protein function and its role in LDLR internalization. Here, we aimed to validate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) as an appropriate tool to model ARH disease. Fibroblasts from an ARH patient carrying the recently reported nonsense mutation, c.649G>T, were reprogrammed into hiPSCs using Sendai viral vectors. In addition, we used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) to create an gene (also known as ) knockout in two different human iPSC lines. ARH patient-derived iPSCs, ARH-knockout iPSC lines, and control iPSCs were efficiently differentiated into HLCs. Western blot analysis demonstrated the absence of LDLRAP1 in HLCs derived from patient and knockout iPSCs, and this was associated with a decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) uptake in ARH-mutant/knockout HLCs compared to control HLCs. In conclusion, we determined that the recently described point mutation in induces absence of the LDLRAP1 protein, similar to what is seen following knockout. This causes a decreased, although not fully absent, LDL-uptake in ARH-mutant/knockout HLCs. As knockout of or presence of the point mutation results in absence of LDLRAP1 protein, residual LDL uptake might be regulated by LDLRAP1-independent internalization mechanisms. Patient-specific iPSC-derived HLCs can therefore be a powerful tool to further decipher mutations and function of the protein.
Parisa Nikasa, Tine Tricot, Nejat Mahdieh, Hossein Baharvand, Mehdi Totonchi, Mohammad Saeid Hejazi, Catherine M Verfaillie

1539 related Products with: Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells as a Model to Study Autosomal Recessive Hypercholesterolemia.

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#32936664   2020/10/07 To Up

Homozygous autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia in a South Asian child presenting with multiple cutaneous xanthomata.

Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH; OMIM #603813) is an extremely rare disorder of lipid metabolism caused by loss-of-function variants in the LDL receptor adapter protein 1 () gene, which is characterized by severe hypercholesterolaemia and an increased risk of premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We report the case of an 11-year-old girl who presented with multiple painless yellowish papules around her elbows and knees of two-year duration. She had been reviewed by several general practitioners, with some of the papules having been excised, but without a specific diagnosis being made. The child was referred to a paediatric service for further evaluation and treatment of the cutaneous lesions, which appeared xanthomatous in nature. A lipid profile showed severe hypercholesterolaemia. Next generation sequencing analysis of a monogenic hypercholesterolaemia gene panel revealed homozygosity for a pathogenic frameshift mutation, c.71dupG, p.Gly25Argfs*9 in . Her parents and brother, who were asymptomatic, were screened and found to be heterozygous carriers of the variant. There was no known consanguinity in the family. She was commenced on the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, atorvastatin, to good effect, with a ∼76% reduction in LDL-cholesterol at a dose of 50 mg per day. At six-month follow-up, there had been no obvious regression of the xanthomata, but importantly, no enlargement of, or the development of new papular lesions, have occurred. In summary, we report a child who presented with multiple cutaneous xanthomata and was confirmed to have ARH by the presence of a homozygous novel pathogenic frameshift variant in .
V Thadchanamoorthy, Kavinda Dayasiri, S I Majitha, Amanda J Hooper, John R Burnett

2063 related Products with: Homozygous autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia in a South Asian child presenting with multiple cutaneous xanthomata.

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#30777337   2019/01/25 To Up

A new variant (c.1A>G) in LDLRAP1 causing autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia: Characterization of the defect and response to PCSK9 inhibition.

Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in LDLRAP1, which impairs internalization of hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR). ARH patients respond relatively well to statins or the combination of statins and Ezetimibe, but scarce and variable data on treatment with PCSK9 inhibitors is available. We aimed to identify and characterize the defect in a hypercholesterolemic patient with premature cardiovascular disease and determine the response to lipid-lowering treatment.
Carmen Rodríguez-Jiménez, Diego Gómez-Coronado, Manuel Frías Vargas, Francisca Cerrato, Carlos Lahoz, Jose Saban-Ruiz, Daniel González-Nieto, Miguel A Lasunción, José M Mostaza, Sonia Rodríguez-Nóvoa

1684 related Products with: A new variant (c.1A>G) in LDLRAP1 causing autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia: Characterization of the defect and response to PCSK9 inhibition.