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#32480031   2020/05/19 To Up

The prevalence of Rickettsia felis DNA in fleas collected from cats and dogs in the UK.

In a large-scale survey in the UK, recruited veterinary practices were asked to inspect client-ownedcats and dogs, selected at random between April and June 2018, following a standardised flea inspection protocol. A total of 326 veterinary practices participated and 812 cats and 662 dogs were examined during the 3-month period. Fleas were collected, identified to species level and fleas of the same species collected from a single animal were pooled together and treated as a single sample. A total of 470 pooled flea samples were screened by PCR and DNA sequence analysis for a subset of Rickettsia species including R. felis and R. typhi. On analysis, 27 (5.7%) of the pooled flea samples were positive for R. felis DNA; these were predominantly in the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, but one dog flea, Ctenocephalides canis was also positive for this pathogen.
Swaid Abdullah, Phillipa Lait, Chris Helps, Hannah Newbury, Richard Wall

2196 related Products with: The prevalence of Rickettsia felis DNA in fleas collected from cats and dogs in the UK.

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#32480030   2020/05/18 To Up

Retrospective survey of endoparasitism identified in feces of client-owned dogs in North America from 2007 through 2018.

Our main study objective was to determine the prevalence and trend of parasitic infection in client-owned dogs examined at the veterinary parasitology diagnostic laboratory of Oklahoma State University over the past 12 years. All results of centrifugal flotation, saline direct smear, sedimentation, Baermann, acid-fast staining for Cryptosporidium detection, and Giardia antigen examinations on fecal samples from client-owned dogs submitted to the Boren Veterinary Medical Hospital and Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory of Oklahoma State University from 2007 through 2018 were included. The impact of sex, age, and seasonality on the prevalence of parasitic infection was also statistically evaluated. A total of 7,409 cases were included for this study. Majority of cases (79.58%; 5,896/7,409) did not include any parasites, eggs, larva, oocysts, or cysts. Approximately 15.41% (1,142/7,409) of client-owned dogs were infected by at least one parasite, and 5.01% (371/7,409) of dogs were infected by multiple parasites. The most common parasite stage observed was Ancylostoma eggs (8.23%; 610/7,409), followed by Cystoisospora oocysts (5.02%; 372/7,409), Giardia cysts/antigen (4.06%; 301/7,409), Trichuris vulpis eggs (2.74%; 203/7,409), Toxocara canis eggs (2.54%; 188/7,409), Dipylidium caninum proglottids/egg packets (0.84%; 62/7,409), taeniid proglottids/eggs (0.47%; 35/7,409), Sarcocystis sporocysts (0.38%; 28/7,409), Cryptosporidium oocysts (0.30%; 22/7,409), Strongyloides stercoralis larvae (0.20%; 15/7,409), Alaria eggs (0.19%; 14/7,409), Toxascaris leonina eggs (0.18%; 13/7,409), Capillaria eggs (0.16%; 12/7,409), Hammondia-like small coccidian oocysts (0.16%; 12/7,409), Uncinaria stenocephala eggs (0.13%; 10/7,409), Spirometra eggs (0.09%; 7/7,409), Physaloptera eggs (0.09%; 7/7,409), Heterobilharzia americana eggs (0.08%; 6/7,409), Nanophyetus salmincola eggs (0.08%; 6/7,409), trichomonads (0.08%; 6/7,409), Mesocestoides proglottids/eggs (0.05%; 4/7,409), Baylisascaris eggs (0.01%; 1/7,409), Macracanthorhynchus eggs (0.01%; 1/7,409), and Paragonimus kellicotti eggs (0.01%; 1/7,409). In addition to endoparasites, some ectoparasites, such as Demodex mites (0.22%; 16/7,409), Otodectes cynotis mites (0.01%; 1/7,409), Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks (0.01%; 1/7,409), and Sarcoptes scabiei mites (0.01%; 1/7,409), were detected by fecal examinations. Pseudo/spurious parasites were identified in approximately 4.35% of cases (322/7,409). There was no statistically significant difference for parasite prevalence between sexes (p = 0.3231). However, statistically significant differences were observed with certain parasites when compared by age groups, and generally, prevalence of parasitism decreased as age of client-owned dogs increased (p < 0.0001). Statistical analyses also revealed significant differences by months (p = 0.0013). Overall, the prevalence of parasitic infection in client-owned dogs decreased over the past 12 years (p < 0.0001).
Yoko Nagamori, Mark E Payton, Emily Looper, Hadley Apple, Eileen M Johnson

1723 related Products with: Retrospective survey of endoparasitism identified in feces of client-owned dogs in North America from 2007 through 2018.

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#32480012   2020/05/20 To Up

Effects of orthodontic tooth extrusion produced by different techniques, on the periodontal tissues: a histological study in dogs.

The aim of this study was to compare the periodontal tissue changes resulting from different methods of orthodontic tooth extrusion in dogs.
Vanessa Camila da Silva, Rafael Scaf de Molon, Renato Parsekian Martins, Fernando Salimon Ribeiro, Ana Emília Farias Pontes, Daniela Leal Zandim-Barcelos, Fábio Renato Manzolli Leite, Carlos Benatti Neto, Rosemary Adriana Chiérici Marcantonio, Joni Augusto Cirelli

2039 related Products with: Effects of orthodontic tooth extrusion produced by different techniques, on the periodontal tissues: a histological study in dogs.

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#32479831   2020/05/29 To Up

Hyperendemic Dirofilaria immitis infection in a sheltered dog population: an expanding threat in the Mediterranean region.

A study on the occurrence of Dirofilaria immitis and of its vectors was carried out in order to assess the prevalence of the disease in previously non-endemic areas of southern Italy. Blood samples (n = 385) and mosquitoes (n = 1,540) were collected in two dog shelters and analysed by Knott's test and duplex real-time PCR, respectively. Dirofilaria immitis was the most prevalent filarioid (44.2%), while Culex pipiens was the most prevalent mosquito species (68.8%). This high prevalence of D. immitis infection confirms this location as one of the most hyperendemic foci of dirofilariosis in Europe.
Rossella Panarese, Roberta Iatta, Maria Stefania Latrofa, Andrea Zatelli, Aleksandra Ignjatović Ćupina, Fabrizio Montarsi, Marco Pombi, Jairo Alfonso Mendoza-Roldan, Frederic Beugnet, Domenico Otranto

2340 related Products with: Hyperendemic Dirofilaria immitis infection in a sheltered dog population: an expanding threat in the Mediterranean region.

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#32479554   2020/06/01 To Up

Effect of a lactate-guided conditioning program on heart rate variability obtained using 24-Holter electrocardiography in Beagle dogs.

The dogs' responses to training exercise are seldom monitored using physiological variables, and cardiac autonomic regulation (CAR) is a relevant determinant of endurance-training adaptation. There are studies in the literature establishing that regular exercise could interfere with CAR in dogs, measured by heart rate and vagal-derived indexes of heart-rate-variability (HRV). However, few studies were found using a prescribed training program based on the lactate threshold (LT) to determine HRV by a 24-h Holter analysis. The purpose of this study was to test whether an endurance-training program (ETP) guided individually by LT raises time-domain measures of HRV in healthy Beagle dogs. Twenty dogs were assigned to two groups: control (C) and trained (T). The dogs from group T underwent an incremental exercise test (IET) to determine their LT. Both LT and velocity corresponding to the LT (VLT) was determined by visual inspection. T group performed an eight-week endurance-training program consisting of treadmill runs set to 70-80% of the VLT. Next, dogs from the group T have submitted to IET again. The maximal velocities (Vmax) at which achieved by the trained dogs in both IETs were determined. The group S did not undergo IETs or ETP. HRV was determined by the 24-hour-Holter at rest, before and on the 2°, 4°, 6° and 8° training weeks. To examine the HR impact on HRV, standard HRV variables were normalized to prevailing HR. VLT and Vmax rose in group T, indicating an improvement of dogs' aerobic and anaerobic capacity. The normalized standard HRV indexes were relatively attenuated since these variables had a reduction in the degree of correlation concerning an average HR. The ETP resulted in decreased resting heart rate and increased time-domain indices, highlighting the log-transformed square root of the mean sum of the squared differences between R-R intervals (Ln rMSSD). The lactate-guided endurance-training program could lead to better parasympathetic cardiac modulation in Beagle dogs.
Alejandro Z Restan, Aparecido A Camacho, Juliana A Cerqueira, Evandro Zacché, Murillo D Kirnew, Bruna A Loureiro, Samara B Silva, Henriette G Moranza, Guilherme C Ferraz

2568 related Products with: Effect of a lactate-guided conditioning program on heart rate variability obtained using 24-Holter electrocardiography in Beagle dogs.

100 UG1 Product tipe: Instrumen100ug100 μg100ug Lyophilized100 μg100ug100ug1 Set1 mL

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#32479397   2020/04/28 To Up

Predicting military working dog core temperature during exertional heat strain: Validation of a Canine Thermal Model.

Military working dogs (MWDs) operate under a wide range of conditions, including hot environments. Predicting how long a MWD can safely work without overheating is important for both health and performance. A Canine Thermal Model (CTM) was developed to predict core temperature (Tc) of MWDs. The CTM calculates heat storage from the balance of heat production from metabolism and heat exchange with the environment. Inputs to the CTM are: meteorological conditions (ambient temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation and wind speed), physical characteristics of the dog (mass, length), and metabolic activity (MET level, estimated from accelerometer data). The CTM was validated against Tc measured in 23 MWDs during training sessions (11.6 ± 5.0 min (mean ± standard deviation), range 4-26 min) in October (24 °C, 52% RH), March (14 °C, 74% RH), or August (28 °C, 64% RH), and 24 kennel MWDs during a standard exercise walk (11.4 ± 3.3 min, range 5.6-18 min) in July (26 °C, 77% RH). The CTM was considered acceptable if predicted Tc was within ±0.5 °C of measured Tc at the end of exercise. Compared to Tc at the end of training sessions (39.8 ± 0.6 °C, range 38.4-41.1 °C) and exercise walks (40.0 ± 0.7 °C, range 38.9-41.4 °C), the CTM-predicted Tc was within ±0.5 °C for 71 of 84 cases (85%) and 19 of 24 cases (79%), respectively. The mean difference between CTM-predicted and measured final Tc during training was -0.04 ± 0.43 °C, with 80 of 84 cases (95%) within the range of ±2 SD (Bland Altman comparison). During exercise walks the mean difference was -0.15 °C ± 0.57, with 23 of 24 cases (96%) within ±2 SD. These results support the use of the CTM to predict Tc of MWDs for the types of physical activities described above.
Catherine O'Brien, William J Tharion, Anthony J Karis, Heather M Sullivan

2578 related Products with: Predicting military working dog core temperature during exertional heat strain: Validation of a Canine Thermal Model.



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#32479060   2020/06/01 To Up

Flexible Drift Tube for High Resolution Ion Mobility Spectrometry (Flex-DT-IMS).

This paper describes, in detail, the development of a novel, low-cost and flexible drift tube (DT) along with an associated ion mobility spectrometer system. The DT is constructed from a flexible printed circuit board (PCB), with a bespoke 'dog-leg' track design, that can be rolled up for ease of assembly. The approach incorporates a shielding layer, as part of the flexible PCB design, and represents the minimum dimensional footprint conceivable for a DT. The low thermal mass of the polyimide substrate and overlapping electrodes, as afforded by the dog-leg design, allow for efficient heat management and high field linearity within the tube - achieved from a single PCB. This is further enhanced by a novel double-glazing configuration which provides a simple and effective means for gas management, minimizing thermal variation within the assembly. Herein, we provide a full experimental characterization of the flexible DT ion mobility spectrometer (Flex-DT-IMS) with corresponding electrodynamic (Simion 8.1) and fluid dynamic (SolidWorks) simulations. The Flex-DT-IMS is shown to have a resolution >80 and a detection limit of low nanograms for the analysis of common explosives (RDX, PETN, HMX and TNT).
Barry Lee Smith, Cedric Boisdon, Iain S Young, Thanit Praneenararat, Tirayut Vilaivan, Simon Maher

1174 related Products with: Flexible Drift Tube for High Resolution Ion Mobility Spectrometry (Flex-DT-IMS).

96 Tests/kit250ul50 assays96 Tests4 Arrays/Slide20 ul1

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#32478678   // To Up

Correction of muscular dystrophies by CRISPR gene editing.

Muscular dystrophies are debilitating disorders that result in progressive weakness and degeneration of skeletal muscle. Although the genetic mutations and clinical abnormalities of a variety of neuromuscular diseases are well known, no curative therapies have been developed to date. The advent of genome editing technology provides new opportunities to correct the underlying mutations responsible for many monogenic neuromuscular diseases. For example, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, has been successfully corrected in mice, dogs, and human cells through CRISPR/Cas9 editing. In this Review, we focus on the potential for, and challenges of, correcting muscular dystrophies by editing disease-causing mutations at the genomic level. Ideally, because muscle tissues are extremely long-lived, CRISPR technology could offer a one-time treatment for muscular dystrophies by correcting the culprit genomic mutations and enabling normal expression of the repaired gene.
Francesco Chemello, Rhonda Bassel-Duby, Eric N Olson

2016 related Products with: Correction of muscular dystrophies by CRISPR gene editing.

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