Only in Titles

Search results for: Host

paperclip

#34118782   2021/06/05 To Up

Selenium respiration in anaerobic bacteria: Does energy generation pay off?

Selenium (Se) respiration in bacteria was revealed for the first time at the end of 1980s. Although thermodynamically-favorable, energy-dense and documented in phylogenetically-diverse bacteria, this metabolic process appears to be accompanied by a number of challenges and numerous unanswered questions. Selenium oxyanions, SeO and SeO, are reduced to elemental Se (Se) through anaerobic respiration, the end product being solid and displaying a considerable size (up to 500 nm) at the bacterial scale. Compared to other electron acceptors used in anaerobic respiration (e.g. N, S, Fe, Mn, and As), Se is one of the few elements whose end product is solid. Furthermore, unlike other known bacterial intracellular accumulations such as volutin (inorganic polyphosphate), S, glycogen or magnetite, Se has not been shown to play a nutritional or ecological role for its host. In the context of anaerobic respiration of Se oxyanions, biogenic Se appears to be a by-product, a waste that needs proper handling, and this raises the question of the evolutionary implications of this process. Why would bacteria use a respiratory substrate that is useful, in the first place, and then highly detrimental? Interestingly, in certain artificial ecosystems (e.g. upflow bioreactors) Se might help bacterial cells to increase their density and buoyancy and thus avoid biomass wash-out, ensuring survival. This review article provides an in-depth analysis of selenium respiration (model selenium respiring bacteria, thermodynamics, respiratory enzymes, and genetic determinants), complemented by an extensive discussion about the evolutionary implications and the properties of biogenic Se using published and original/unpublished results.
Lucian C Staicu, Larry L Barton

1848 related Products with: Selenium respiration in anaerobic bacteria: Does energy generation pay off?

96 tests 5 G100ug Lyophilized100 ug2 100 assays100 μg250ul48 assays 100 μg

Related Pathways

paperclip

#34118728   2021/06/09 To Up

Vaccine hesitancy in migrant communities: a rapid review of latest evidence.

B
Akhenaten Siankam Tankwanchi, Brett Bowman, Michelle Garrison, Heidi Larson, Charles Shey Wiysonge

2620 related Products with: Vaccine hesitancy in migrant communities: a rapid review of latest evidence.

400Tests1 Set96T100 μg100 μg100 μg100 μg25 Bags/Unit100ul100 assays

Related Pathways

    No related Items
paperclip

#34118489   2021/06/09 To Up

Acute experimental barrier injury triggers ulcerative colitis specific innate hyper-responsiveness and ulcerative colitis-type microbiome changes in humans.

The trigger hypothesis opens the possibility of anti-flare-initiation therapies by stating that ulcerative colitis (UC) flares originates from inadequate responses to acute mucosal injuries. However, experimental evidence is restricted by a limited use of suitable human models. We thus aimed to investigate the acute mucosal barrier injury responses in humans with and without UC using an experimental injury model.
Jakob Benedict Seidelin, Martin Iain Bahl, Tine Rask Licht, Benjamin E Mead, Jeffrey M Karp, Jens Vilstrup Johansen, Lene Buhl Riis, Marina Ramírez Galera, Anders Woetmann, Jacob Tveiten Bjerrum

1039 related Products with: Acute experimental barrier injury triggers ulcerative colitis specific innate hyper-responsiveness and ulcerative colitis-type microbiome changes in humans.

4 Membranes/Box2 Pieces/Box1 mg250 ml1 mL4 Membranes/Box2 Pieces/Box96T50ug4 Arrays/Slide

Related Pathways

paperclip

#34118469   2021/06/09 To Up

Long-term follow-up of ruxolitinib in the treatment of steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).

Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) remains a major barrier to a successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); in cases refractory to first-line therapy with steroids, there is no standard of care for second-line therapy. As such, ruxolitinib is a promising drug in this scenario. We retrospectively analyzed its efficacy and safety as treatment of steroid-refractory cGVHD in 35 patients from two transplant centers, with the longest follow-up described to date. Evaluated patients had a median of 3 organs affected (1-7), with most (64%) having moderate cGVHD. The median number of previous therapy lines was two (1-6). Overall response rate was 89% (complete response, 26%) after a median of 4 weeks of therapy. Median follow-up was 43 months (range 11-59). At follow-up, of the 27 patients still alive, 18 patients (67%) are free of any immunosuppression, and 6 (22%) are using ruxolitinib as the only immunosuppressive drug. Failure-free survival was 77.1%, 68.6%, 54% and 51,4% at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached. Toxicities were mostly hematological and resolved after dose reduction in most cases. In conclusion, our data, which represent the cohort of patients with cGVHD treated with ruxolitinib with the longest follow-up to date, support the use of this drug as a safe and effective option for refractory cGVHD.
Aliana Meneses Ferreira, Roberta Shcolnik Szor, Vinicius Campos Molla, Maria Cristina Seiwald, Pedro Arruda de Moraes, Ana Rita Brito Medeiros da Fonseca, Erick Menezes Xavier, Mariana Gomes Serpa, Luciana Tucunduva, Yana Novis, Celso Arrais-Rodrigues

1726 related Products with: Long-term follow-up of ruxolitinib in the treatment of steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).

50 UG 0.1 mg 100 μg100 μg50 500 tests100 μg100 μg100 ul100 ul96 tests

Related Pathways

paperclip

#34118468   2021/06/09 To Up

Enhanced immune reconstitution of γδ T cells after allograft overcomes negative impact of pre-transplant MRD positive status in AML patients.: γδ T cells and MRD+ AML.

Minimal residual disease (MRD) prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) in AML is a poor risk factor for outcome. The γδ T cells represents a unique minority lymphocyte population which is preferentially located in peripheral tissues, can recognize antigens in non-MHC restricted manner and plays a "bridging" role between innate and adaptive immune system.
Evgeny Klyuchnikov, Anita Badbaran, Radwan Massoud, Ulrike Fritsche-Friedland, Dietlinde Janson, Francis Ayuk, Christine Wolschke, Ulrike Bacher, Nicolaus Kröger

2247 related Products with: Enhanced immune reconstitution of γδ T cells after allograft overcomes negative impact of pre-transplant MRD positive status in AML patients.: γδ T cells and MRD+ AML.

96 tests96 tests1mg25 TESTS1 mg100ml100 extractions0.1ml (1mg/ml)1.00 flask

Related Pathways

paperclip

#34118385   2021/06/09 To Up

Compctutational identification of putative common genomic drug and vaccine targets in Mycoplasma genitalium.

Mycoplasma genitalium is an obligate intracellular bacterium that is responsible for several sexually transmitted infections, including non-gonococcal urethritis in men and several inflammatory reproductive tract syndromes in women. Here, we applied subtractive genomics and reverse vaccinology approaches for in silico prediction of potential vaccine and drug targets against five strains of M. genitalium. We identified 403 genes shared by all five strains, from which 104 non-host homologous proteins were selected, comprising of 44 exposed/secreted/membrane proteins and 60 cytoplasmic proteins. Based on the essentiality, functionality, and structure-based binding affinity, we finally predicted 19 (14 novel) putative vaccine and 7 (2 novel) candidate drug targets. The docking analysis showed six molecules from the ZINC database as promising drug candidates against the identified targets. Altogether, both vaccine candidates and drug targets identified here may contribute to the future development of therapeutic strategies to control the spread of M. genitalium worldwide.
Wylerson G Nogueira, Arun Kumar Jaiswal, Sandeep Tiwari, Rommel T J Ramos, Preetam Ghosh, Debmalya Barh, Vasco Azevedo, Siomar C Soares

1678 related Products with: Compctutational identification of putative common genomic drug and vaccine targets in Mycoplasma genitalium.

100 assays300 units100 assays100 assays100 assays100 assays100 assays100 assays100 assays100 assays100 assays100 assays

Related Pathways

paperclip

#34118383   2021/06/09 To Up

Genome sequence of the cardiopulmonary canid nematode Angiostrongylus vasorum reveals species-specific genes with potential involvement in coagulopathy.

Angiostrongylus vasorum is an emerging parasitic nematode of canids and causes respiratory distress, bleeding, and other signs in dogs. Despite its clinical importance, the molecular toolbox allowing the study of the parasite is incomplete. To address this gap, we have sequenced its nuclear genome using Oxford nanopore sequencing, polished with Illumina reads. The size of the final genome is 280 Mb comprising 468 contigs, with an N50 value of 1.68 Mb and a BUSCO score of 93.5%. Ninety-three percent of 13,766 predicted genes were assigned to putative functions. Three folate carriers were found exclusively in A. vasorum, with potential involvement in host coagulopathy. A screen for previously identified vaccine candidates, the aminopeptidase H11 and the somatic protein rHc23, revealed homologs in A. vasorum. The genome sequence will provide a foundation for the development of new tools against canine angiostrongylosis, supporting the identification of potential drug and vaccine targets.
Annageldi Tayyrov, Nina Gillis-Germitsch, Lucienne Tritten, Manuela Schnyder

2325 related Products with: Genome sequence of the cardiopulmonary canid nematode Angiostrongylus vasorum reveals species-specific genes with potential involvement in coagulopathy.

25 µg4 Membranes/Box2 Pieces/Box4 Membranes/Box2 Pieces/Box4 Arrays/Slide1 ml4 Arrays/Slide 100ul2 Pieces/Box

Related Pathways

paperclip

#34118360   2021/06/09 To Up

Zoonotic and Reverse Zoonotic Transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2.

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is the first known pandemic caused by a coronavirus. Its causative agent, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), appears to be capable of infecting different mammalian species. Recent detections of this virus in pet, zoo, wild, and farm animals have compelled inquiry regarding the zoonotic (animal-to-human) and reverse zoonotic (human-to-animal) transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 with the potential of COVID-19 pandemic evolving into a panzootic. It is important to monitor the global spread of disease and to assess the significance of genomic changes to support prevention and control efforts during a pandemic. An understanding of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemiology provides opportunities to prevent the risk of repeated re-infection of humans and requires a robust One Health-based investigation. This review paper describes the known properties and the existing gaps in scientific knowledge about the zoonotic and reverse zoonotic transmissibility of the novel virus SARS-CoV-2 and the COVID-19 disease it causes.
Iryna V Goraichuk, Vasiliy Arefiev, Borys T Stegniy, Anton P Gerilovych

1800 related Products with: Zoonotic and Reverse Zoonotic Transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2.

100 ug/vial500 mg50 ug Product tipe: Antib200 25 mg 5 G10010 mg100ug500100 µg

Related Pathways

paperclip

#34118359   2021/06/09 To Up

Positive Selection as a Key Player for SARS-CoV-2 Pathogenicity: Insights into ORF1ab, S and E genes.

The human β-coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 epidemic started in late December 2019 in Wuhan, China. It causes Covid-19 disease which has become pandemic. Each of the five-known human β-coronaviruses has four major structural proteins (E, M, N and S) and 16 non-structural proteins encoded by ORF1a and ORF1b together (ORF1ab) that are involved in virus pathogenicity and infectivity. Here, we performed detailed positive selection analyses for those six genes among the four previously known human β-coronaviruses and within 38 SARS-CoV-2 genomes to assess signatures of adaptive evolution using maximum likelihood approaches. Our results suggest that three genes (E, S and ORF1ab genes) are under strong signatures of positive selection among human β-coronavirus, influencing codons that are located in functional important protein domains. The E protein-coding gene showed signatures of positive selection in two sites, Asp 66 and Ser 68, located inside a putative transmembrane α-helical domain C-terminal part, which is preferentially composed by hydrophilic residues. Such Asp and Ser sites substitutions (hydrophilic residues) increase the stability of the transmembrane domain in SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, substitutions in the spike (S) protein S1 N-terminal domain have been found, all of them were located on the S protein surface, suggesting their importance in viral transmissibility and survival. Furthermore, evidence of strong positive selection was detected in three of the SARS-CoV-2 nonstructural proteins (NSP1, NSP3, NSP16), which are encoded by ORF1ab and play vital roles in suppressing host translation machinery, viral replication and transcription and inhibiting the host immune response. These results are insightful to assess the role of positive selection in the SARS-CoV-2 encoded proteins, which will allow to better understand the virulent pathogenicity of the virus and potentially identifying targets for drug or vaccine strategy design.
Mohamed Emam, Mariam Oweda, Agostinho Antunes, Mohamed El-Hadidi

2894 related Products with: Positive Selection as a Key Player for SARS-CoV-2 Pathogenicity: Insights into ORF1ab, S and E genes.

1 g100tests1,000 tests100ug Lyophilized

Related Pathways

paperclip

#34118347   2021/06/09 To Up

Recent Advances in Potential Drug Therapies Combating COVID-19 and Related Coronaviruses-A Perspective.

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are a large family of viruses responsible for the severe pathophysiological effects on human health. The most severe outbreak includes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The COVID-19 poses major challenges to clinical management because no specific FDA-approved therapy yet to be available. Thus, the existing therapies are being used for the treatment of COVID-19, which are under clinical trials and compassionate use, based on in vitro and in silico studies. In this review, we summarize the potential therapies utilizing small molecules, bioactive compounds, nucleoside and nucleotide analogs, peptides, antibodies, natural products, and synthetic compounds targeting the complex molecular signaling network involved in COVID-19. In this review>230 natural and chemically synthesized drug therapies are described with their recent advances in research and development being done in terms of their chemical, structural and functional properties. This review focuses on possible targets for viral cells, viral proteins, viral replication, and different molecular pathways for the discovery of novel viral- and host-based therapeutic targets against SARS-CoV-2.
Shivraj Hariram Nile, Arti Nile, Shivkumar Jalde, Guoyin Kai

1026 related Products with: Recent Advances in Potential Drug Therapies Combating COVID-19 and Related Coronaviruses-A Perspective.

5 mg100 assays2 Pieces/Box100 assays100 assays100 assays2 Pieces/Box100 assays100 assays100 assays2 Pieces/Box100 assays

Related Pathways