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Search results for: Lactoperoxidase

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#32730276   2020/07/30 To Up

Oxidative killing of encapsulated and nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae by lactoperoxidase-generated hypothiocyanite.

Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pneumococcus) infections affect millions of people worldwide, cause serious mortality and represent a major economic burden. Despite recent successes due to pneumococcal vaccination and antibiotic use, Pneumococcus remains a significant medical problem. Airway epithelial cells, the primary responders to pneumococcal infection, orchestrate an extracellular antimicrobial system consisting of lactoperoxidase (LPO), thiocyanate anion and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). LPO oxidizes thiocyanate using H2O2 into the final product hypothiocyanite that has antimicrobial effects against a wide range of microorganisms. However, hypothiocyanite's effect on Pneumococcus has never been studied. Our aim was to determine whether hypothiocyanite can kill S. pneumoniae. Bactericidal activity was measured in a cell-free in vitro system by determining the number of surviving pneumococci via colony forming units on agar plates, while bacteriostatic activity was assessed by measuring optical density of bacteria in liquid cultures. Our results indicate that hypothiocyanite generated by LPO exerted robust killing of both encapsulated and nonencapsulated pneumococcal strains. Killing of S. pneumoniae by a commercially available hypothiocyanite-generating product was even more pronounced than that achieved with laboratory reagents. Catalase, an H2O2 scavenger, inhibited killing of pneumococcal by hypothiocyanite under all circumstances. Furthermore, the presence of the bacterial capsule or lytA-dependent autolysis had no effect on hypothiocyanite-mediated killing of pneumococci. On the contrary, a pneumococcal mutant deficient in pyruvate oxidase (main bacterial H2O2 source) had enhanced susceptibility to hypothiocyanite compared to its wild-type strain. Overall, results shown here indicate that numerous pneumococcal strains are susceptible to LPO-generated hypothiocyanite.
Aaron D Gingerich, Fayhaa Doja, Rachel Thomason, Eszter Tóth, Jessica L Bradshaw, Martin V Douglass, Larry S McDaniel, Balázs Rada

1731 related Products with: Oxidative killing of encapsulated and nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae by lactoperoxidase-generated hypothiocyanite.

50 UG200ul1 mL125 mg20 mg200 1000 tests100ug0.1 mg1 ml10 mg

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#32598266   2020/06/27 To Up

A comprehensive in silico study towards understanding the inhibitory mechanism of Lactoperoxidase by Dapsone and Propofol.

Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is a member of mammalian heme peroxidase family and is an enzyme of innate immune system. It possesses a covalently linked heme prosthetic group (a derivative of protoporphyrin IX) in its active site. LPO catalyzes the oxidation of halides and pseudohalides in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and shows a broad range of antimicrobial activity.
Rameez Jabeer Khan, Rajat Kumar Jha, Gizachew Muluneh Amera, Jayaraman Muthukumaran, Rashmi Prabha Singh, Amit Kumar Singh

2879 related Products with: A comprehensive in silico study towards understanding the inhibitory mechanism of Lactoperoxidase by Dapsone and Propofol.

10mg100.00 ug5mg100 ug250 TESTS10mg1mg100uL5mg

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#32474185   2020/05/21 To Up

Ultrasound stabilization of raw milk: Microbial and enzymatic inactivation, physicochemical properties and kinetic stability.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-thermal and thermal high-intensity ultrasound (HIUS) treatment on the microbial and enzymatic inactivation, physicochemical properties, and kinetic stability of the raw milk by applying different energy densities (1, 3, 5, and 7 kJ/mL). Two HIUS treatments were evaluated based on different nominal powers, named HIUS-A and HIUS-B, using 100 W and 475 W, respectively. HIUS-A treatment was non-thermal processing while HIUS-B was a thermal treatment only for the energy densities of 5 and 7 kJ/mL since the final temperature was above 70 °C. The HIUS-B treatment showed to be more efficient. Log reductions up to 3.9 cycles of aerobic mesophilic heterotrophic bacteria (AMHB) were achieved. Significant reductions of the fat globule size, with diameters lower than 1 µm, better color parameters, and kinetic stability during the storage were observed. Also, HIUS-B treatment inactivated the alkaline phosphatase and lactoperoxidase. The HIUS-B treatment at 3 kJ/mL worked below 57 °C being considered a border temperature since it did not cause unwanted physicochemical effects. Furthermore, a microbial inactivation of 1.8 ± 0.1 log cycles of AMHB was observed. A proper inactivation of only the Alkaline phosphatase and a significant reduction of the fat globules sizes, which kept the milk kinetically stable during storage was achieved.
Hugo Scudino, Eric Keven Silva, Andresa Gomes, Jonas T Guimarães, Rosiane L Cunha, Anderson S Sant'Ana, M Angela A Meireles, Adriano G Cruz

1616 related Products with: Ultrasound stabilization of raw milk: Microbial and enzymatic inactivation, physicochemical properties and kinetic stability.

10 mg200 200ug25 mg1000 tests100ug200ul10 mg100 mg0.1 mg10 mg

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#32438810   2020/06/05 To Up

In Depth Analysis of the Contribution of Specific Glycoproteins to the Overall Bovine Whey N-Linked Glycoprofile.

The N-linked glycoprofile of bovine whey is the combined result of individual protein glycoprofiles. In this work, we provide in-depth structural information on the glycan structures of known whey glycoproteins, namely, lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase, α-lactalbumin, immunoglobulin-G (IgG), and glycosylation-dependent cellular adhesion molecule 1 (GlyCAM-1, PP3). The majority (∼95%) of -glycans present in the overall whey glycoprofile were attributed to three proteins: lactoferrin, IgG, and GlyCAM-1. We identified specific signature glycans for these main proteins; lactoferrin contributes oligomannose-type glycans, while IgG carries fucosylated di-antennary glycans with Gal-β(1,4)-GlcNAc (LacNAc) motifs. GlyCAM-1 is the sole whey glycoprotein carrying tri- and tetra-antennary structures, with a high degree of fucosylation and sialylation. Signature glycans can be used to recognize individual proteins in the overall whey glycoprofile as well as for protein concentration estimations. Application of the whey glycoprofile analysis to colostrum samples revealed dynamic protein concentration changes for IgG, lactoferrin, and GlyCAM-1 over time.
Rivca L Valk-Weeber, Cecile Deelman-Driessen, Lubbert Dijkhuizen, Talitha Eshuis-de Ruiter, Sander S van Leeuwen

2253 related Products with: In Depth Analysis of the Contribution of Specific Glycoproteins to the Overall Bovine Whey N-Linked Glycoprofile.

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#32334145   2020/04/17 To Up

Xanthine oxidase-lactoperoxidase system and innate immunity: Biochemical actions and physiological roles.

The innate immune system in mammals is the first-line defense that plays an important protective role against a wide spectrum of pathogens, especially during early life before the adaptive immune system develops. The enzymes xanthine oxidase (XO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are widely distributed in mammalian tissues and secretions, and have a variety of biological functions including in innate immunity, provoking much interest for both in vitro and in vivo applications. The enzymes are characterized by their generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, including hydrogen peroxide, hypothiocyanite, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite. XO is a major generator of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide that subsequently trigger a cascade of oxidative radical pathways, including those produced by LPO, which have bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects against pathogens including opportunistic bacteria. In addition to their role in host microbial defense, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species play important physiological roles as second messenger cell signaling molecules, including cellular proliferation, differentiation and gene expression. There are several indications that the reactive species generated by peroxide have positive effects on human health, particularly in neonates; however, some important in vivo aspects of this system remain obscure. The primary dependence of the system on hydrogen peroxide has led us to propose it is particularly relevant to neonate mammals during milk feeding.
Saad S Al-Shehri, John A Duley, Nidhi Bansal

2545 related Products with: Xanthine oxidase-lactoperoxidase system and innate immunity: Biochemical actions and physiological roles.

1,000 tests200ug1 mg1000 tests100ug50 ug 25 mg2.5 mg10 mg5mg 5 G

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#32300997   // To Up

Retraction Note to: Immobilization of lactoperoxidase on ZnO nanoparticles with improved stability.

The Editors have retracted this article [1] because significant parts of the text were duplicated from previously published articles by Ziyae et al. 2019 [2], Movahedi et al. 2019 [3] and Ziyae et al. 2018 [4]. The authors have not responded to any correspondence regarding this retraction.
Mehrnaz Movahedi, Seyed Ziyae Aldin Samsam Shariat, Habibollah Nazem, Mehrdad Movahedi

2753 related Products with: Retraction Note to: Immobilization of lactoperoxidase on ZnO nanoparticles with improved stability.

125 ml 6 ml 25 MG1 mg100 μg 2 ml Ready-to-use 6 ml Ready-to-use 0.2 mg 25 ml Ready-to-use 100.00 ug2.5 mg1 ml

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#32292011   2020/03/01 To Up

Use of Enzymes in Dairy Industry: A Review of Current Progress.

This review paper aimed to provides precious information about the function and use of different enzymes in dairy food applications. An enzyme is called a protein and catalyzes a specific reaction. Every enzyme is intended to initiate a particular reaction with a specific outcome. Moreover, numerous enzymes are present in the human body. Dairy food applications include the use of different enzymes, such as protease, to lessen the allergic properties of bovine milk products and lipase to improve the flavor of the cheese. Caseins, which are acid-soluble, are free from a flavor and can be suitable for addition to beverages and acidy foods by the limitation of proteolysis. The hydrolysates of casein are better to use in foods based on milk proteins for newborn children with allergy to bovine milk. Lipolysis makes a significant role in the flavor of Swiss cheese. The peppery flavor of Blue cheese is produced by short-chain unsaturated fats and methyl ketones. Many minor enzymes with limited application in dairy processes are sulphydryl oxidase, lactoperoxidase, glucose oxidase, catalase, lysozyme, and superoxide dismutase. Both catalase and glucose oxidase are utilized in food preservation processes. The scope minor enzymes in milk products needed for better production of dairy products and for the future of dairy technology. The worldwide market for the production of microbial enzymes used in dairy products processing is impressively increasing; however, there are a limited number of enzyme-producing industries in the market. The production of proteinase, lactase, lipase, and microbial rennet is increasing in the laboratory and small scales. In near future, the need for these enzymes will be undoubtedly significantly increasing essentially due to the requirement of significant nutritional valuable dairy products in the country to overcome malnutrition and obesity and shift toward low-fat and healthy foods.
U Khan, Z Selamoglu

2610 related Products with: Use of Enzymes in Dairy Industry: A Review of Current Progress.

20 ul (10 mM)100 μg 1 G100 μg100 μg100ug100 μg100ug100 μg1 Set

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#32285581   // To Up

Effects of oral administration of colostrum whey in peripartum goat on antimicrobial peptides in postpartum milk.

The present study was conducted to examine whether colostrum supplementation in peripartum goats increases the antimicrobial peptides in their milk. Goats were orally administered 2 ml of colostrum whey products (colostrum group) or water (control group) daily, from 2 weeks before until 2 weeks after kidding. Body weights of mothers and kids were measured. Blood, milk, and fecal samples were collected from the mothers, and blood samples were collected from the kids. Concentrations of milk antimicrobial peptides (beta-defensin, cathelicidin, lactoferrin, S100A7, lactoperoxidase, and immunoglobulin A [IgA]) were determined. IgA and nutritional parameters (glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, ketone bodies, and non-esterified fatty acids) were also determined in the blood of mothers and kids. Milk IgA and lactoferrin concentrations were higher in the colostrum group than in the control group. Conversely, lower milk concentrations of S100A7 were observed in the colostrum group than that in the control group. Plasma IgA concentrations were higher for kids from the colostrum group than for those from the control group. These results suggest that oral administration of colostrum in pregnant goats increases IgA concentration in postpartum milk, which can subsequently improve the health of their kids.
Naoki Isobe, Shoko Matsukawa, Kota Kubo, Kazutoshi Ueno, Toshihisa Sugino, Takahiro Nii, Yukinori Yoshimura

2042 related Products with: Effects of oral administration of colostrum whey in peripartum goat on antimicrobial peptides in postpartum milk.

100 μg100 μg100 μg100 μg100 μg100 μg100 μg100 μg100 μg100 μg100 μg100 μg

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#32260154   2020/04/03 To Up

Innate Antimicrobial Defense of Skin and Oral Mucosa.

This special issue intends to review and update our understanding of the antimicrobial defense mechanisms of the skin and oral cavity. These two environments are quite different in terms of water, pH, and nutrient availability, but have some common antimicrobial factors. The skin surface supports the growth of a limited range of microorganisms but provides a hostile environment for others. The growth of most microorganisms is prevented or limited by the low pH, scarcity of some nutrients such as phosphorus and the presence of antimicrobial peptides, including defensins and cathelicidins, and antimicrobial lipids, including certain fatty acids and long-chain bases. On the other hand, the oral cavity is a warm, moist, nutrient rich environment which supports the growth of diverse microflora. Saliva coating the oral soft and hard surfaces determines which microorganisms can adhere to these surfaces. Some salivary proteins bind to bacteria and prevent their attachment to surfaces. Other salivary peptides, including defensins, cathelicidins, and histatins are antimicrobial. Antimicrobial salivary proteins include lysozyme, lactoferrin, and lactoperoxidase. There are also antimicrobial fatty acids derived from salivary triglycerides and long-chain bases derived from oral epithelial sphingolipids. The various antimicrobial factors determine the microbiomes of the skin surface and the oral cavity. Alterations of these factors can result in colonization by opportunistic pathogens, and this may lead to infection. Neutrophils and lymphocytes in the connective tissue of skin and mucosa also contribute to innate immunity.
Philip W Wertz, Sarah de Szalay

2512 related Products with: Innate Antimicrobial Defense of Skin and Oral Mucosa.

100ug 100ul100 mg100ug Lyophilized1000 tests 5 G500 MG

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#32246075   2020/04/03 To Up

Milk lactoperoxidase decreases ID1 and ID3 expression in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

Milk consumption may modify the risk of squamous cell carcinoma. The role of milk to modulate the gene expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells has not been investigated so far. Here, HSC2 oral squamous carcinoma cells were exposed to an aqueous fraction of human milk and a whole-genome array was performed. Among the genes that were significantly reduced by human and cow milk were the DNA-binding protein inhibitor 1 (ID1), ID3 and Distal-Less Homeobox 2 (DLX2) in HSC2 cells. Also, in TR146 oral squamous carcinoma cells, there was a tendency towards a decreased gene expression. Upon size fractionation, lactoperoxidase but not lactoferrin and osteopontin was identified to reduce ID1 and ID3 in HSC2 cells. Dairy products and hypoallergenic infant formula failed to decrease the respective genes. These data suggest that milk can reduce the expression of transcription factors in oral squamous carcinoma cells.
Layla Panahipour, Maria De Biasi, Theresa Sophia Bokor, Alexandra Thajer, Nadja Haiden, Reinhard Gruber

1002 related Products with: Milk lactoperoxidase decreases ID1 and ID3 expression in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

96tests96tests

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