Only in Titles

           Search results for: Methyl Green Pyronin Solution    

paperclip

#19384746   // Save this To Up

Staining of macromolecules: possible mechanisms and examples.

This review is based on a presentation given at the Biological Stain Commission meeting in June 2008. I discuss staining as an interaction between dye, solvent, and biological macromolecules. Most staining takes place in water, where the physico-chemical properties of the macromolecules are particularly important. Staining from aqueous solution is summarized. The first step is diffusion-ion exchange, which builds up the dye ion concentration close to the appropriately charged tissue constituents. While charge interactions are important for selectivity and build-up of dye ions around specific tissue and cell constituents, they have in most cases little to do with actual dye binding. The next step, actual binding, is predominantly between aromatic and other non-polar parts of the dye and corresponding groups in the tissue constituent. This results in a reduction of the total hydrophobic area exposed to water, hence the term hydrophobic interaction. Because dye binding is predominantly by dispersive forces, the larger the aromatic dye system and the fewer the number of charges on the dye, the greater the substantivity or affinity. Some relatively straightforward anionic or cationic one-step staining systems are discussed also. These include amyloid staining with Congo red, elastin staining with orceins, collagen staining with picrofuchsin, DNA-RNA staining with methyl green-pyronin Y, acid heteroglycan staining with Alcian blue, and metachromatic staining.

1695 related Products with: Staining of macromolecules: possible mechanisms and examples.

AZD-3514 Mechanisms: Andr BMS-754807 Mechanisms: IG MLN-2480 Mechanisms: Raf Rabbit anti Androgen Rece SensiTek HRP Anti-Mouse RDEA-119 (BAY-869766) Mec ABT-199 Mechanisms: Bcl-2 Androgen Receptor (Ab-650 SensiTek Alk-Phos Anti-P MS-275 (Entinostat) Mecha GSK-126 Mechanisms: EZH2 Androgen Receptor , Mouse

Related Pathways

paperclip

#17106093   // Save this To Up

Evaluation of the overall accuracy of the DeLaval cell counter for somatic cell counts in ovine milk.

The DeLaval cell counter (DCC) is a portable device designed for on-farm somatic cell count (SCC) analysis in bovine milk. This study evaluated the performance of the DCC when analyzing ovine milk. A total of 29 composite ovine milk samples, ranging between 20 x 10(3) and 2,200 x 10(3) cells/mL, were divided into 15 aliquots/milk sample corresponding to 5 SCC methods using 3 types of preservation (unpreserved, azidiol, and bronopol). The SCC methods were the Fossomatic (FSCC), the DCC in undiluted samples, and the DCC in samples diluted 1:1 in 3 different types of diluents (PBS + Triton X-100, PBS + ethidium bromide + Triton X-100, and PBS + propidium iodide + Triton X-100). All analyses were carried out in duplicate. In addition, each sample was analyzed in quadruplicate by the direct microscopic method (DMSCC) using Pyronin Y-methyl green as a stain. Comparison of methods was based on overall accuracy studies (means comparison, repeatability, and regression studies vs. DMSCC and FSCC as reference methods). The DCC methods used to analyze milk samples diluted in staining solution (with ethidium bromide or propidium iodide) showed large coefficients of regression (b = 0.91 to 1.01) and correlation (r > 0.99) when compared with the DMSCC and FSCC methods. In these samples the DCC gave repeatability values (s(r) = 33 to 48 x 10(3) cells/mL) similar to the DMSCC (s(r) = 36 x 10(3) cells/mL), and their log SCC means (5.52 to 5.54) did not differ from the reference value (5.54). However, undiluted samples analyzed by the DCC method showed large standard deviations of repeatability and SCC values lower than those by the DMSCC or FSCC methods, probably because of the high solids content in ovine milk. The type of preservation did not affect the outcomes. Consequently, the DCC was determined to be accurate when analyzing diluted ovine milk based on comparison with the SCC reference methods.

1773 related Products with: Evaluation of the overall accuracy of the DeLaval cell counter for somatic cell counts in ovine milk.

Multiple lung carcinoma ( Tissue array of ovarian g Macrophage Colony Stimula FDA Standard Frozen Tissu Cell Meter™ Fluorimetri Goat Anti- T-cell differe Myo inositol galactoside, Rabbit Anti-Cell death in Rabbit Anti-Cell death in MarkerGene™ LysoLive™ MarkerGeneTM in vivo lacZ Rabbit Anti-Insect Cell L

Related Pathways

paperclip

#16643667   // Save this To Up

Histological staining methods preparatory to laser capture microdissection significantly affect the integrity of the cellular RNA.

Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis of cells enriched by laser capture microdissection (LCM) faces several technical challenges. Frozen sections yield higher quality RNA than paraffin-imbedded sections, but even with frozen sections, the staining methods used for histological identification of cells of interest could still damage the mRNA in the cells. To study the contribution of staining methods to degradation of results from gene expression profiling of LCM samples, we subjected pellets of the mouse plasma cell tumor cell line TEPC 1165 to direct RNA extraction and to parallel frozen sectioning for LCM and subsequent RNA extraction. We used microarray hybridization analysis to compare gene expression profiles of RNA from cell pellets with gene expression profiles of RNA from frozen sections that had been stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Nissl Stain (NS), and for immunofluorescence (IF) as well as with the plasma cell-revealing methyl green pyronin (MGP) stain. All RNAs were amplified with two rounds of T7-based in vitro transcription and analyzed by two-color expression analysis on 10-K cDNA microarrays.

1708 related Products with: Histological staining methods preparatory to laser capture microdissection significantly affect the integrity of the cellular RNA.

FDA Standard Frozen Tissu FDA Standard Frozen Tissu FDA Standard Frozen Tissu FDA Standard Frozen Tissu Recombinant Thermostable Normal rat multiple organ Recombinant Thermostable CSL Gradient Thermal Cycl Rat Anti-CCT theta Antibo Theophylline CAS Number [ Tube Strips 8 thermo Stri Normal mouse multiple org

Related Pathways

paperclip

#12713139   // Save this To Up

Methyl green-pyronin Y staining of nucleic acids: studies on the effects of staining time, dye composition and diffusion rates.

Since the introduction of the methyl green-pyronin Y procedure as a differential histological stain more than 100 years ago, the method has become a histochemical procedure for differential demonstration of DNA and RNA. Numerous variants of the procedure have been suggested, and a number of hypotheses have been put forward concerning kinetics and binding mechanisms. Using both filter paper models containing DNA, RNA or heparin and histological sections, we have attempted to evaluate the kinetics of staining and the role of staining time for methyl green and pyronin Y by applying the dyes individually, simultaneously and sequentially. The results are presented as color charts approximating the observed staining patterns using a computerized palette. Our results indicate unequivocally that the differential staining is not time-dependent, but that it is dictated by the relative concentrations of methyl green and pyronin Y and by the pH of the staining solution.

2888 related Products with: Methyl green-pyronin Y staining of nucleic acids: studies on the effects of staining time, dye composition and diffusion rates.

SYBR Green I Gel Staining Caspase 8 Staining Kit, SYBR Green I Gel Staining Methyl Green Pyronin Sol Caspase 12 Staining Kit, Caspase 9 Staining Kit, SYBR Green I Gel Staining Caspase Staining Kit, Ca Caspase 9 Staining Kit, Cell Navigator™ Lysosom SYBR Green I Gel Staining Methyl Green Pyronin Sol

Related Pathways

paperclip

#11928282   // Save this To Up

[Reperfusion injury in the isolated rat liver after hypothermic preservation].

Histological changes which appear as a result of reperfusion injury of cold-preserved rat liver were studied at intervals of 0 hr, 3 hr, 24 hr and 48 hr of cold storage. The isolated livers were stored in a UW solution (University of Wisconsin), which is used in human liver transplantations. Computer image analysis of light microscopic sections (methyl green-pyronin stained) was used for the study and quantification of injured cells. The method of TUNEL was performed to prove possible apoptosis of sinusoidal endothelial cells and heptocytes. Bile production during reperfusion and ALT, AST, LDH and ACP were measured in the reperfusion medium at the end of the 90 min reperfusion. It has been confirmed that prolongation of the cold storage of liver results in extensive changes in the liver structure and increased injury of liver cells. Sinusoidal endothelial cells were damaged more and earlier than hepatocytes. It has been shown that methyl green-pyronin stained sections are advantageous for the study of these morphological changes, allowing the strongest view of these changes. The appearance of TUNEL positive cells and an increase in the levels of biochemical parameters, e.g. AST or ALT, indicate earlier cell injury. The methodology described in this article can be used for the study of reperfusion injury of the liver and for the study of this phenomenon in other experiments.

2044 related Products with: [Reperfusion injury in the isolated rat liver after hypothermic preservation].

Multiple diseases of live Liver cancer survey tissu FDA Standard Frozen Tissu Liver cancer survey tissu Liver cancer tissue array Liver cancer test tissue Liver cancer and normal t Liver cancer antibody scr p130Cas-associated protei Liver cancer (hepatocellu Liver disease spectrum ti Liver cancer survey tissu

Related Pathways

paperclip

#11272810   // Save this To Up

Effects of various decalcification protocols on detection of DNA strand breaks by terminal dUTP nick end labelling.

To analyse DNA strand breaks by terminal deoxy(d)-UTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) in calcified tissues including bones and teeth, it is important to decalcify the tissues first. However, the effects of decalcifying reagents on the integrity of DNA are largely unknown. In the present study, we evaluated the usefulness of various decalcifying reagents including 10% EDTA (pH 7.4), 5% trichloroacetic acid (TCA), 5% formic acid, 5% HCl, 10% nitric acid, Plank-Rychlo's solution, Morse's solution and K-CX solution in TUNEL staining. Mouse maxilla was selected as the experimental system. Apoptotic cells naturally occurring in the epithelium were analysed. Tissues were assessed by soft X-ray imaging to confirm complete decalcification. The time required for decalcification of the tissue was 7 days with 10% EDTA and 2 days with other decalcifiers. Decalcified tissues were stained with Methyl/Green-Pyronine Y or 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole for assessment of DNA integrity. Nuclei of epithelial cells were strongly positive for both dyes after decalcification with 10% EDTA, 5% TCA, Morse's solution and 5% formic acid. The other reagents failed to retain DNA. Our results demonstrated good TUNEL staining of the maxilla treated with 10% EDTA or 5% TCA. Based on the required time for processing and the signal-noise ratio, we recommend 5% TCA as the decalcifying reagent to analyse for DNA strand breaks.

1403 related Products with: Effects of various decalcification protocols on detection of DNA strand breaks by terminal dUTP nick end labelling.

Beta Amyloid (40) ELISA K Beta Amyloid (1 42) ELISA Ofloxacin CAS Number [824 Anti AQP2(aquaporin 2) (N Rabbit Anti-Tenascin C (C Endothelial Lipase Peptid Recombinant E. coli HSP70 Gram Negative Endotoxin a Human Endocrine Gland Vas Anti-Amyloid Precursor Pr Rabbit Anti-DNase gamma P Amyloid Precursor Protein

Related Pathways