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Search results for: Mouse IgG, 100mg

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#31177081   2019/06/07 To Up

Zerumbone from Zingiber zerumbet inhibits innate and adaptive immune responses in Balb/C mice.

Zerumbone exhibited various biological properties including in vitro immunosuppressive effects. However, its modulatory activity on the immune responses in experimental animal model is largely unknown. This investigation was conducted to explore the effects of daily treatment of zerumbone (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) isolated from Zingiber zerumbet rhizomes for 14 days on various cellular and humoral immune responses in Balb/C mice. For measurement of adaptive immunity, sheep red blood cells (sRBC) were used to immunize the mice on day 0 and orally fed with similar doses of zerumbone for 14 days. The effects of zerumbone on phagocytosis, nitric oxide (NO) release, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, proliferation of T and B cells, lymphocyte phenotyping, cytokines release in serum by activated T cells, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and immunoglobulins production (IgG and IgM) were investigated. Zerumbone downregulated the engulfment of E. coli by peritoneal macrophages and the release of NO and MPO in a concentration-dependent manner. Zerumbone showed significant and concentration-dependent suppression of T and B lymphocytes proliferation and inhibition of the Th1 and Th2 cytokines release. At higher concentrations of zerumbone, the % expression of CD4 and CD8 in splenocytes was significantly inhibited. Zerumbone also concentration-dependently demonstrated strong suppression on sRBC-triggered swelling of mice paw in DTH. Substantial suppression of anti-sRBC immunoglobulins antibody titer was noted in immunized and zerumbone-treated mice in a concentration-dependent manner. The potent suppressive effects of zerumbone on the immune responses suggest that zerumbone can be a potential candidate for development of immunosuppressive agent.
Ibrahim Jantan, Md Areeful Haque, Menaga Ilangkovan, Laiba Arshad

1440 related Products with: Zerumbone from Zingiber zerumbet inhibits innate and adaptive immune responses in Balb/C mice.

1mg100 250 mg100ug Lyophilized 10 MG1 Set1 Set100ug

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#30529500   2018/12/04 To Up

Generation of two high affinity anti-mouse FcRn antibodies: Inhibition of IgG recycling in wild type mice and effect in a mouse model of immune thrombocytopenia.

Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by pathogenic immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies that bind to platelets, causing their phagocytic removal and leading to reductions in platelet number. The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) selectively salvages and recycles IgG, including pathogenic IgG, thereby extending the half-life of IgG in plasma. Two anti-mouse FcRn monoclonal antibodies (mAb) (4470 and 4464) were generated to evaluate the effect of inhibiting IgG recycling. Statistically significant reductions in plasma IgG concentration were observed upon administration of 4470 (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg) in wild-type mice. In a passive mouse model of ITP, 4464 alleviated the reduction in platelet number and/or preserved newly produced platelets when dosed prophylactically as well as in a therapeutic dosing regimen once platelet numbers had already been reduced. These results support the investigation of anti-FcRn therapy as a potential treatment for ITP.
Bryan Smith, Louis Christodoulou, Alison Clargo, Alison Eddleston, Kevin Greenslade, Daniel Lightwood, Anthony Shock, Kerry Tyson, Frank R Brennan

1711 related Products with: Generation of two high affinity anti-mouse FcRn antibodies: Inhibition of IgG recycling in wild type mice and effect in a mouse model of immune thrombocytopenia.

100.00 ug0.1ml (1mg/ml)100.00 ug100 100.00 ug100 μg100 μg100 μg100.00 ug100 μg100 ul0.5 mg

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#30270100   2018/09/27 To Up

Taurine administration prevents the intestine from the damage induced by beta-lactoglobulin sensitization in a murine model of food allergy.

Allergy to cow's milk proteins has often been associated with dysfunction of the intestinal mucosa caused by chronic inflammation in infants. This study evaluated the protective effect of taurine on intestinal damage induced by beta-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) in Balb/c mice used as an animal model of allergy to cow's milk proteins.
S Aïnad-Tabet, H Grar, A Haddi, H Negaoui, A Guermat, O Kheroua, D Saïdi

2892 related Products with: Taurine administration prevents the intestine from the damage induced by beta-lactoglobulin sensitization in a murine model of food allergy.

100ul196 assays100ug 100ul

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#28400152   2017/04/08 To Up

Anti-CD3 antibody therapy attenuates the progression of hypertension in female mice with systemic lupus erythematosus.

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder with prevalent hypertension that significantly contributes to the mortality in this patient population. Pre-clinical and clinical evidence suggests that anti-CD3 antibody therapy may attenuate the development of autoimmune diseases like SLE. However, it is unclear whether this treatment impacts the development of the prevalent hypertension associated with SLE. The present study was designed to determine whether anti-CD3 antibody treatment attenuates the progression of hypertension in female SLE mice with already established renal disease (albuminuria ≥100mg/dL). Female SLE (NZBWF1) and control (NZW) mice were administered either an antibody to CD3ε, a component of the T cell receptor complex expressed on all T cells, or IgG antibody (isotype control) for up to 4 weeks (intranasal; 25μg/week). Spleen weight was lower in SLE mice treated with anti-CD3 antibody than in IgG-treated SLE mice, suggesting that immune system hyperactivity is decreased. Circulating anti-dsDNA autoantibodies were increased in SLE mice compared to controls and were blunted in the anti-CD3-treated SLE mice. The development of hypertension was attenuated in anti-CD3 treated mice with SLE independently of changes in renal injury (assessed by urinary albumin). These data suggest anti-CD3 therapy during autoimmune disease may have added clinical benefit to attenuate cardiovascular risk factors like hypertension.
Keisa W Mathis, Erin B Taylor, Michael J Ryan

2655 related Products with: Anti-CD3 antibody therapy attenuates the progression of hypertension in female mice with systemic lupus erythematosus.

100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized50 ul100ug100ug100ug100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug

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#27765364   2016/08/17 To Up

Phyllanthin from Phyllanthus amarus inhibits cellular and humoral immune responses in Balb/C mice.

Phyllanthin found in many Phyllanthus species has various biochemical and pharmacological properties especially on its hepatoprotective effects. However, its effect on the immune system has not been well documented.
Menaga Ilangkovan, Ibrahim Jantan, Syed Nasir Abbas Bukhari

1946 related Products with: Phyllanthin from Phyllanthus amarus inhibits cellular and humoral immune responses in Balb/C mice.

1mg96 assays100 MG100ug Lyophilized100 μg1 Set100ug Lyophilized

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#20727369   2010/08/18 To Up

Lactoferrin increases both resistance to Salmonella typhimurium infection and the production of antibodies in mice.

Lactoferrin (Lf) is a multifunctional iron-binding glycoprotein with antibacterial and immunomodulatory activities. The antibacterial influence of orally administered bovine Lf (bLf) against murine infection caused by Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) has scarcely been explored. In the current study, Balb/c mice were treated orally for 7 days with either 5 or 100mg of bovine lactoferrin (bLf). On day 7 of treatment, mice were intragastrically infected with a lethal or sublethal dose of colony forming units (CFU) of S. typhimurium. During treatment with bLf, feces from mice sublethally infected were harvested daily to prepare fecal suspensions, which were serially diluted and plated onto Salmonella Shigella agar to estimate CFU/g of feces. After sacrificing the animals on day 7, 14 or 21 post-infection, samples of intestinal fluid, Peyer's patches (PP), liver and spleen were collected to count the number of CFU by plate dilution. Intestinal secretions were also employed, along with serum samples, to evaluate total IgA, IgG and IgM antibodies, and those against Salmonella surface proteins and bLf by ELISA assay. In lethally infected mice both bLf doses decreased mortality. In sublethally infected mice, both bLf doses decreased bacterial shedding in feces and intestinal fluid, and also reduced bacterial colonization at PP and bacterial translocation in the liver and spleen. Levels of total and those IgG and IgM in serum and IgA in intestinal secretions against Salmonella surface proteins and bLf were enhanced with both doses of bLf. These findings suggest that the effect of bLf against the infection by S. typhimurium in mice may be the result of an antimicrobial activity linked with its modulatory effect on immunocompetent cells (from intestinal and peripheral organs) involved in antibody production.
Maria Elisa Drago-Serrano, Victor Rivera-Aguilar, Aldo A Reséndiz-Albor, Rafael Campos-Rodríguez

2368 related Products with: Lactoferrin increases both resistance to Salmonella typhimurium infection and the production of antibodies in mice.

1 mg2 mL100 100 μg100 μg4 Arrays/Slide100 μg

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#12076638   // To Up

Development of viper-venom antibodies in chicken egg yolk and assay of their antigen binding capacity.

The therapeutic use of specific antibodies is invaluable in certain clinical conditions, such as administration of specific antivenom for snakebite envenomation. The production of antibodies and their purification from mammalian blood has been found low yielding and laborious. Most antivenom is polyvalent whole serum or partially purified immunoglobulin. The side effects of anti-snake-venom therapy include serum sickness and can be reduced by using mono-specific antivenom in sufficiently pure form. We have attempted to standardize a simple method for producing avian antivenom in relatively pure form from eggs. The isolation is very simple and involves only two steps, namely, removal of lipids from the diluted egg yolk followed by gel filtration. Each egg produces 80-100mg of pure immunoglobulin, and specific antibodies are present for up to 100 days after immunization. Thus, large quantities of the Ig can be obtained in pure form using only small amounts of venom. Antigen binding was shown by Ouchterlony's double diffusion experiments and the avian antivenom neutralizes the thrombin-like activity of equivalent amounts of venom on human plasma. The LD(50) of the venom was approximately 3mg/kg body weight in mice and rats but when pre-incubated with equivalent amounts (by weight) of egg IgG injected subcutaneously, all the animals survived. In a similar experiment using a commercial horse IgG, 25% mortality is seen. These results indicate that the antivenom immunoglobulins purified from immunized chicken egg yolk is biologically active and the possibility of their therapeutic use will be investigated further.
C Maya Devi, M Vasantha Bai, L K Krishnan

1734 related Products with: Development of viper-venom antibodies in chicken egg yolk and assay of their antigen binding capacity.

0.1ml (1mg/ml)100.00 ug1000 TESTS/0.65ml100.00 ug100.00 ug48 assays100 μg100.00 ug100.00 ug0.1 mg4 Membranes/Box

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#10766181   // To Up

The human antimouse immunoglobulin response and the anti-idiotypic network have no influence on clinical outcome in patients with minimal residual colorectal cancer treated with monoclonal antibody CO17-1A.

Murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), when administered to patients, induce a human antimouse immunoglobulin immune response, especially when multiple infusions are required to obtain therapeutic efficacy. In a randomized Phase II clinical study, 83 patients with colorectal carcinoma of stage Dukes C were treated with the murine IgG2a mAb 17-1A (ab1) after curative surgery. The regimen consisted of a single infusion of 500mg of 17-1A within 2 weeks after surgery, followed by 100mg of mAbs four times every 4 weeks. Sera were taken every 2-3 weeks and screened for human antimouse antibodies (HAMA). HAMA were measured by a capture ELISA and an indirect antihuman immunoglobulin ELISA for the analysis of IgG and IgM isotypes. Anti-idiotypic antibodies (ab2) were detected by an inhibition ELISA, and anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies (ab3), recognizing the original antigen, were determined by flow cytometric analysis. About 20% of patients failed to develop HAMA; in the other patients, antibody titers were initially low after the first two infusions and reached their maximum only after a fifth infusion at 18-20 weeks after surgery. An analysis that differentiated between patients who developed recurrences and those who remained tumor-free did not show any difference in antibody titers between the two groups, neither for total HAMA nor for IgG, IgM, or ab2. The formation of ab3 was analyzed in eight patients and proved to be negative in all of them. HAMA remained detectable up to 2 years after the last treatment. In patients who experienced adverse events associated with therapy, HAMA titers tended to rise earlier; this difference, however, was not statistically significant. Thus, neither a beneficial nor a detrimental effect of HAMA formation could be determined for the clinical response to antibody therapy.
R Gruber, L J van Haarlem, S O Warnaar, E Holz, G Riethmüller

2839 related Products with: The human antimouse immunoglobulin response and the anti-idiotypic network have no influence on clinical outcome in patients with minimal residual colorectal cancer treated with monoclonal antibody CO17-1A.

100 ul

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