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#35044153   2022/01/19 To Up

Enzyme-Free Autocatalysis-Driven Feedback DNA Circuits for Amplified Aptasensing of Living Cells.

Aptasensors with high specificity have emerged as powerful tools for understanding various biological processes, thus providing tremendous opportunities for clinical diagnosis and prognosis. However, their applications in intracellular molecular imaging are largely impeded due to the low anti-interference capacity in biological environments and the moderate sensitivity to targets. Herein, a robust enzyme-free autocatalysis-driven feedback DNA circuit is devised for amplified aptasensing, for example, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and thrombin, with a significantly improved sensitivity in living cells. This initiator-replicated hybridization chain reaction (ID-HCR) circuit was acquired by integrating the HCR circuit with the DNAzyme biocatalysis. Also, the autocatalysis-driven aptasensor consists of a recognition element and an amplification element. The recognition unit can specifically identify ATP or thrombin via a versatile conformational transformation, resulting in the exposure of the initiator to the autocatalysis-driven circuit. The ID-HCR element integrates the charming self-assembly characteristics of the HCR and the remarkable catalytic cleavage capacity of DNAzyme for realizing the continuously self-sustained regeneration or replication of trigger strands and for achieving an exponential signal gain. The autocatalysis-driven aptasensor has been validated for quantitative analysis of ATP and thrombin in vitro and for monitoring the corresponding aptamer substrates with various expressions in live cells. More importantly, the autocatalysis-driven aptasensor, as a versatile amplification strategy, holds enormous potential for analysis of other less abundant biomarkers by changing only the recognition element of the system.
Yuhui Gao, Yingying Chen, Jinhua Shang, Shanshan Yu, Shizhen He, Ran Cui, Fuan Wang

1683 related Products with: Enzyme-Free Autocatalysis-Driven Feedback DNA Circuits for Amplified Aptasensing of Living Cells.

1KG500gm100gm5L50gm5 x 200ul/Unit

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#35043633   2022/01/19 To Up

Wash-Free, Sandwich-Type Protein Detection Using Direct Electron Transfer and Catalytic Signal Amplification of Multiple Redox Labels.

Direct electron transfer (DET) between a redox label and an electrode has been used for sensitive and selective sandwich-type detection without a wash step. However, applying DET is still highly challenging in protein detection, and a single redox label per probe is insufficient to obtain a high electrochemical signal. Here, we report a wash-free, sandwich-type detection of thrombin using DET and catalytic signal amplification of multiple redox labels. The detection scheme is based on (i) the redox label-catalyzed oxidation of a reductant, (ii) the conjugation of multiple redox labels per probe using a poly-linker, (iii) the low nonspecific adsorption of the conjugated poly-linker due to uncharged, reduced redox labels, and (iv) a facile DET using long, flexible poly-linker and spacer DNA. Amine-reactive phenazine ethosulfate and NADH were used as the redox label and reductant, respectively. N-terminated polylysine was used as the poly-linker for the conjugation between an aptamer probe and multiple redox labels. Approximately 11 redox labels per probe and rapid catalytic NADH oxidation enable high signal amplification. Thrombin in urine could be detected without a wash step with a detection limit of ∼50 pM, which is practically promising for point-of-care testing of proteins.
Gyeongho Kim, Hyejin Cho, Ponnusamy Nandhakumar, Jin Kyoon Park, Kwang-Sun Kim, Haesik Yang

1463 related Products with: Wash-Free, Sandwich-Type Protein Detection Using Direct Electron Transfer and Catalytic Signal Amplification of Multiple Redox Labels.

31mg100ul500 100ug Lyophilized100 μg50

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#35043562   2022/01/19 To Up

Non-natural protein-protein communication mediated by a DNA-based, antibody-responsive device.

We report here the rational design and optimization of an antibody responsive, DNA-based device that enables communication between pairs of otherwise non-interacting proteins. The device is designed to recognize and bind a specific antibody and, in response, undergo a conformational change that leads to the release of a DNA strand, termed the "translator," that regulates the activity of a downstream target protein. As proof of principle, we demonstrate antibody-induced control of the proteins thrombin and Taq DNA polymerase. The resulting strategy is versatile and, in principle, can be easily adapted to control artificial protein-protein communication in artificial regulatory networks.
Simona Ranallo, Daniela Sorrentino, Elisabetta Delibato, Gianfranco Ercolani, Kevin W Plaxco, Francesco Ricci

1205 related Products with: Non-natural protein-protein communication mediated by a DNA-based, antibody-responsive device.

100ug Lyophilized100ug1 Set1 Set1 Set1 Set1 Set100ug100ug Lyophilized 100ul100ug Lyophilized1 Set

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#35038779   2022/01/17 To Up

Measurement of procoagulant platelets provides mechanistic insight and diagnostic potential in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a prothrombotic, immune-mediated adverse drug reaction associated with high rates of thrombosis-related morbidity and mortality caused by FcγRIIa-activating pathogenic antibodies to PF4-heparin. Procoagulant platelets are a platelet subset that promote thrombin generation, are clinically relevant in prothrombotic diseases and are formed when platelet G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and ITAM-linked receptors are co-stimulated.
Christine S M Lee, Maria V Selvadurai, Leonardo Pasalic, James Yeung, Maria Konda, Geoffrey W Kershaw, Emmanuel J Favaloro, Vivien M Chen

2996 related Products with: Measurement of procoagulant platelets provides mechanistic insight and diagnostic potential in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

100ug16 Arrays/Slide100 ul96 tests400 ug16 Arrays/Slide100ug

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#35037739   2022/01/17 To Up

Thrombin in complex with dabigatran can still interact with PAR-1 via exosite-I and instigate loss of vascular integrity.

Atrial fibrillation (AF) can lead to the loss of microvascular integrity thereby enhancing AF progression. Mechanistically, the pro-coagulant state that drives the risk of stroke in patients with AF may also play a causal role in microvascular loss. DOACs, the preferred anticoagulants in AF, can target factors upstream (FXa) or downstream (thrombin) in the coagulation cascade and mediate differential vascular effects through interaction with protease-activated receptors (PARs).
Sophie C Dólleman, Stijn M Agten, Henri M H Spronk, Tilman M Hackeng, Mettine H A Bos, Henri H Versteeg, Anton Jan van Zonneveld, Hetty C de Boer

2526 related Products with: Thrombin in complex with dabigatran can still interact with PAR-1 via exosite-I and instigate loss of vascular integrity.

100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized

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#35037458   2022/01/17 To Up

Development of Cellulose Nanofibril/Casein-Based 3D Composite Hemostasis Scaffold for Potential Wound-Healing Application.

Excessive bleeding in traumatic hemorrhage is the primary concern for natural wound healing and the main reason for trauma deaths. The three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting of bioinks offers the desired structural complexity vital for hemostasis activity and targeted cell proliferation in rapid and controlled wound healing. However, it is challenging to develop suitable bioinks to fabricate specific 3D scaffolds desirable in wound healing. In this work, a 3D composite scaffold is designed using bioprinting technology and synergistic hemostasis mechanisms of cellulose nanofibrils (TCNFs), chitosan, and casein to control blood loss in traumatic hemorrhage. Bioinks that consist of casein bioconjugated TCNF (with a casein content of 104.5 ± 34.1 mg/g) using the carbodiimide cross-linker chemistry were subjected to bioprinting for customizable 3D scaffold fabrication. Further, the 3D composite scaffolds were cross-linked using a green ionic complexation approach. The covalent conjugation among TCNF, casein, and chitosan was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The hemostasis activity of the 3D composite scaffold was analyzed by a human thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) assay and adsorption of red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets. The 3D composite scaffold had a better swelling behavior and a faster whole blood clotting rate at each time point than the 3D TCNF scaffold and commercial cellulose-based dressings. The TAT assay demonstrated that the 3D composite scaffold could form a higher content of thrombin (663.29 pg/mL) and stable blood clot compared to a cellulosic pad (580.35 pg/mL), 3D TCNF (457.78 pg/mL), and cellulosic gauze (328.92 pg/mL), which are essential for faster blood coagulation. In addition, the 3D composite scaffold had a lower blood clotting index (23.34%) than the 3D TCNF scaffold (41.93%), suggesting higher efficiencies for RBC entrapping to induce blood clotting. The cytocompatibility was evaluated by a 3D cell culture study, and results showed that the 3D composite scaffold could promote growth and proliferation of NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells, which is vital for wound healing. Cellulase-based deconstruction of the 3D composite scaffold showed significant weight loss (80 ± 5%) compared to the lysozyme hydrolysis (22 ± 5%) after 28 days of incubation, suggesting the biodegradation potential of the composite scaffold. In conclusion, this study proposes efficient prospects to develop a 3D composite scaffold from bioprinting of TCNF-based bioinks that can accelerate blood clotting and wound healing, suggesting its potential application in reducing blood loss during traumatic hemorrhage.
Santosh Shivaji Biranje, Jianzhong Sun, Lu Cheng, Yu Cheng, Yifei Shi, Sujie Yu, Haixin Jiao, Meng Zhang, Xuechu Lu, Wenjia Han, Qianqian Wang, Zhen Zhang, Jun Liu

1538 related Products with: Development of Cellulose Nanofibril/Casein-Based 3D Composite Hemostasis Scaffold for Potential Wound-Healing Application.

100ul0.1ml (1mg/ml)0.1ml (1mg/ml)100ug Lyophilized 100ul 100ul 100ul 100ul100ug Lyophilized 100ul50ul (1mg/ml)

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#35037393   2022/01/17 To Up

Alpha-2-macroglobulin in hemostasis and thrombosis: an underestimated old double-edged sword.

Antiproteinases such as alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2M) play a role in hemostasis. A2M is highly conserved throughout evolution and is a high molecular weight homo-tetrameric glycoprotein. A2M proteinase inhibitor activity is possible via a unique cage structure leading to proteinase entrapment without direct enzymatic activity inhibition. Following this entrapment, proteinase clearance is possible through A2M binding to the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: LRP1. A2M synthesis is regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and increases during several chronic or acute inflammatory diseases and varies with age. For instance, A2M plasma levels are known to be increased in patients with diabetes mellitus, nephrotic syndrome, or sepsis. Concerning hemostasis, A2M can trap many proteinases involved in coagulation and fibrinolysis. Because of its pleiotropic effects A2M can be seen as both anti- and pro-hemostatic. A2M can inhibit thrombin, factor Xa, activated protein C, plasmin, tissue-plasminogen activator and urokinase. Through its many different functions A2M is generally put apart in the balanced regulation of hemostasis. In addition, the fact that A2M plasma levels are differently regulated during inflammatory-related diseases and that A2M can neutralize cytokines that also modify hemostasis could explain why it is difficult to link common proteins and parameters of hemostasis with the mechanisms of thrombosis in such diseases. Thus, we propose in the present review to summarize known functions of A2M, give a brief overview about diseases, and then to focus on the roles of this antiproteinase in hemostasis and thrombosis.
Jeremy Lagrange, Thomas Lecompte, Tanja Knopp, Patrick Lacolley, Véronique Regnault

2168 related Products with: Alpha-2-macroglobulin in hemostasis and thrombosis: an underestimated old double-edged sword.

100ug Lyophilized100ug500 100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug100ug100ug100ug Lyophilized0.1 ml 100ul

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#35035521   2022/01/07 To Up

ceRNA Network and Functional Enrichment Analysis of Preeclampsia by Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis.

Preeclampsia (PE) is a multisystemic syndrome which has short- and long-term risk to mothers and children and has pluralistic etiology.
Chenxu Wang, Chaofan Yang, Xinying Wang, Guanlun Zhou, Chao Chen, Guorong Han

1505 related Products with: ceRNA Network and Functional Enrichment Analysis of Preeclampsia by Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis.

2 modules1 module1 module1 module2 modules1 module1 module 1000 ml 1 module

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#35033222   2022/01/13 To Up

Direct oral anticoagulants for use in paediatrics.

With the increasing incidence of thromboembolism in children and improvement in management for patients with medically complex diseases, expanded availability of safe and effective anticoagulant medications is needed. Traditionally, the most common anticoagulants used for the treatment or prevention of venous thromboembolism or embolic stroke in children were either unfractionated heparin or the low-molecular-weight heparins. These medications require either intravenous access or daily subcutaneous injections, in addition to multiple venepunctures to monitor drug concentrations. Direct oral anticoagulants provide an alternative, and potentially safer, choice for children, as they are available in oral formulations and do not require drug monitoring. With the approval of the direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban (by the European Medicines Agency and Health Canada), and the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran (by the European Medicines Agency and US Food and Drug Administration), the field of paediatric anticoagulation is changing. In this Review, we provide an overview of the four direct oral anticoagulants approved in adults for the treatment and prevention of thrombosis and the completed and ongoing paediatric trials.
Julie Jaffray, Guy Young

1530 related Products with: Direct oral anticoagulants for use in paediatrics.

1 G 5 G48 samples500 MG 100 G250 mg 1 G

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