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#33096582   2020/10/23 To Up

Traffic noise exposure, cognitive decline, and amyloid-beta pathology in an AD mouse model.

Concerns are growing that exposure to environmental pollutants, such as traffic noise, might cause cognitive impairments and predispose individuals toward the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia. In this study in a knock-in mouse model of AD, we investigated how chronic traffic noise exposure (CTNE) impacts cognitive performance and amyloid-beta (Aβ) pathology. A group of APP mice was exposed to CTNE (70 dB , 8 hours/day for 1 month) and compared with non-exposed counterparts. Following CTNE, an increase in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsivity was observed by corticosterone assay of the blood. One month after CNTE, the CTNE group demonstrated impairments in cognitive and motor functions, and indications of anxiety-like behavior, relative to the control animals. The noise-exposed group also showed elevated Aβ aggregation, as inferred by a greater number of plaques and larger average plaque size in various regions of the brain, including regions involved in stress regulation. The results support that noise-associated dysregulation of the neuroendocrine system as a potential risk factor for developing cognitive impairment and Aβ pathology, which should be further investigated in human studies.
Hadil Karem, Jogender Mehla, Bryan Kolb, Majid H Mohajerani

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#33096559   2020/10/23 To Up

Brain-E, Does It Equate to Brainy?


Maret G Traber

2328 related Products with: Brain-E, Does It Equate to Brainy?

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#33096543   2020/10/23 To Up

Klotho, PTSD, and advanced epigenetic age in cortical tissue.

This study examined the klotho (KL) longevity gene polymorphism rs9315202 and psychopathology, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and alcohol-use disorders, in association with advanced epigenetic age in three postmortem cortical tissue regions: dorsolateral and ventromedial prefrontal cortices and motor cortex. Using data from the VA National PTSD Brain Bank (n = 117), we found that rs9315202 interacted with PTSD to predict advanced epigenetic age in motor cortex among the subset of relatively older (>=45 years), white non-Hispanic decedents (corrected p = 0.014, n = 42). An evaluation of 211 additional common KL variants revealed that only variants in linkage disequilibrium with rs9315202 showed similarly high levels of significance. Alcohol abuse was nominally associated with advanced epigenetic age in motor cortex (p = 0.039, n = 114). The rs9315202 SNP interacted with PTSD to predict decreased KL expression via DNAm age residuals in motor cortex among older white non-Hispanics decedents (indirect β = -0.198, p = 0.027). Finally, in dual-luciferase enhancer reporter system experiments, we found that inserting the minor allele of rs9315202 in a human kidney cell line HK-2 genomic DNA resulted in a change in KL transcriptional activities, likely operating via long noncoding RNA in this region. This was the first study to examine multiple forms of psychopathology in association with advanced DNA methylation age across several brain regions, to extend work concerning the association between rs9315202 and advanced epigenetic to brain tissue, and to identify the effects of rs9315202 on KL gene expression. KL augmentation holds promise as a therapeutic intervention to slow the pace of cellular aging, disease onset, and neuropathology, particularly in older, stressed populations.
Erika J Wolf, Ci-Di Chen, Xiang Zhao, Zhenwei Zhou, Filomene G Morrison, Nikolaos P Daskalakis, Annjanette Stone, Steven Schichman, Jaclyn Garza Grenier, Dana Fein-Schaffer, Bertrand R Huber, , Carmela R Abraham, Mark W Miller, Mark W Logue

2115 related Products with: Klotho, PTSD, and advanced epigenetic age in cortical tissue.

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#33096542   2020/10/23 To Up

Stress impacts corticoamygdalar connectivity in an age-dependent manner.

Stress is a socio-environmental risk factor for the development of psychiatric disorders, with the age of exposure potentially determining the outcome. Several brain regions mediate stress responsivity, with a prominent role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) and their reciprocal inhibitory connectivity. Here we investigated the impact of stress exposure during adolescence and adulthood on the activity of putative pyramidal neurons in the BLA and corticoamygdalar plasticity using in vivo electrophysiology. 155 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a combination of footshock/restraint stress in either adolescence (postnatal day 31-40) or adulthood (postnatal day 65-74). Both adolescent and adult stress increased the number of spontaneously active putative BLA pyramidal neurons 1-2 weeks, but not 5-6 weeks post stress. High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of BLA and mPFC depressed evoked spike probability in the mPFC and BLA, respectively, in adult but not adolescent rats. In contrast, an adult-like BLA HFS-induced decrease in spike probability of mPFC neurons was found 1-2 weeks post-adolescent stress. Changes in mPFC and BLA neuron discharge were found 1-2 weeks post-adult stress after BLA and mPFC HFS, respectively. All these changes were transient since they were not found 5-6 weeks post adolescent or adult stress. Our findings indicate that stress during adolescence may accelerate the development of BLA-PFC plasticity, probably due to BLA hyperactivity, which can also disrupt the reciprocal communication of BLA-mPFC after adult stress. Therefore, precocious BLA-mPFC connectivity alterations may represent an early adaptive stress response that ultimately may contribute to vulnerability to adult psychiatric disorders.
Daniela L Uliana, Felipe V Gomes, Anthony A Grace

2586 related Products with: Stress impacts corticoamygdalar connectivity in an age-dependent manner.

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#33096528   2020/10/23 To Up

Traumatic axonal injury on clinical MRI: association with the Glasgow Coma Scale score at scene of injury or at admission and prolonged posttraumatic amnesia.

The aim in this study was to investigate if MRI findings of traumatic axonal injury (TAI) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are related to the admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and prolonged duration of posttraumatic amnesia (PTA).
Hans Kristian Moe, Turid Follestad, Nada Andelic, Asta Kristine Håberg, Anne-Mari Holte Flusund, Kjell Arne Kvistad, Elin Hildrum Saksvoll, Øystein Olsen, Sebastian Abel-Grüner, Oddrun Sandrød, Toril Skandsen, Anne Vik, Kent Gøran Moen

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#33096526   2020/10/23 To Up

A tribute to the late Professor Donald Simpson, Australian neurosurgeon and namesake of the Simpson grading system for meningioma extent of resection.

Donald Simpson (1927-2018) was a neurosurgeon from Adelaide, Australia, who is often cited for the 1957 publication he wrote as a trainee on the relationship between extent of resection and outcomes for meningiomas. That paper summarized a series of over 300 patients operated on in England by well-known neurosurgeons Sir Hugh Cairns and Joseph Buford Pennybacker. Simpson was also known later in his career, when he was at the University of Adelaide in South Australia, for his contributions to the areas of hydrocephalus, spina bifida, craniofacial anomalies, head injury, brain abscesses, and neurosurgical history, and he published extensively on these topics. In addition to his work in clinical neurosurgery, Simpson made humanitarian contributions studying kuru in New Guinea and aiding refugees during the Vietnam War. Simpson was an active member and leader of many Australian surgical organizations and was an officer of the Order of Australia. Donald Simpson's legacy as an adult and pediatric neurosurgeon, an academician, a leader, and a humanitarian is extensive and will prove long lasting. Professor Simpson's life serves as an example from which all neurosurgeons may learn.
Michael R Chicoine, Alexander T Yahanda, Ralph G Dacey

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#33096524   2020/10/23 To Up

Selection of deep brain stimulation contacts using volume of tissue activated software following subthalamic nucleus stimulation.

High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is effective in the treatment of motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Using a patient-specific lead and volume of tissue activated (VTA) software, it is possible to visualize contact positions in the context of the patient's own anatomy. In this study, the authors' aim was to demonstrate that VTA software can be used in clinical practice to help determine the clinical effectiveness of stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing DBS of the STN.
Mathilde Devaluez, Melissa Tir, Pierre Krystkowiak, Mickael Aubignat, Michel Lefranc

2069 related Products with: Selection of deep brain stimulation contacts using volume of tissue activated software following subthalamic nucleus stimulation.

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#33096521   2020/10/23 To Up

Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser-induced thermal therapy for functional hemispherotomy in a child with refractory epilepsy and multiple medical comorbidities.

Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a minimally invasive surgical approach increasingly employed for precise targeted ablation of epileptogenic brain foci. Recent reports have described corpus callosotomy using MRgLITT, though its application in more extensive functional disconnections has not been documented. Here, the authors detail its use in achieving a palliative hemispherotomy in a 5-year-old with medically refractory hemiclonic seizures following a hemispheric infarction, highlighting a novel use of this surgical technique. In this particular case, open craniotomy was deemed high risk given the multiple medical comorbidities including congenital cardiac disease and end-stage renal failure. MRgLITT was considered an alternative approach with a lower risk for periprocedural hemodynamic perturbations. The patient tolerated the procedure well, attaining an Engel class IB outcome at 16 months' follow-up. This suggests that MRgLITT may be an alternative approach to an open hemispherectomy, particularly in cases in which multiple comorbidities pose significant risks and preclude an open procedure.
Melissa M J Chua, Ittai Bushlin, Coral M Stredny, Joseph R Madsen, Archana A Patel, Scellig Stone

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#33096520   2020/10/23 To Up

Letter to the Editor. Brain biopsy in children and adults with neurological diseases of unknown etiology: two sides of the same coin?


Bertrand Mathon, Marc Pineton de Chambrun, Alexandre Le Joncour, Aymeric Amelot

2317 related Products with: Letter to the Editor. Brain biopsy in children and adults with neurological diseases of unknown etiology: two sides of the same coin?

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#33096519   2020/10/10 To Up

A novel CERNNE approach for predicting Parkinson's Disease-associated genes and brain regions based on multimodal imaging genetics data.

The detection and pathogenic factors analysis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has a practical significance for its diagnosis and treatment. However, the traditional research paradigms are commonly based on single neural imaging data, which is easy to ignore the complementarity between multimodal imaging genetics data. The existing researches also pay little attention to the comprehensive framework of patient detection and pathogenic factors analysis for PD. Based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, a novel brain disease multimodal data analysis model is proposed in this paper. Firstly, according to the complementarity between the two types of data, the classical correlation analysis method is used to construct the fusion feature of subjects. Secondly, based on the artificial neural network, the fusion feature analysis tool named clustering evolutionary random neural network ensemble (CERNNE) is designed. This method integrates multiple neural networks constructed randomly, and uses clustering evolution strategy to optimize the ensemble learner by adaptive selective integration, selecting the discriminative features for PD analysis and ensuring the generalization performance of the ensemble model. By combining with data fusion scheme, the CERNNE is applied to forming a multi-task analysis framework, recognizing PD patients and predicting PD-associated brain regions and genes. In the multimodal data experiment, the proposed framework shows better classification performance and pathogenic factors predicting ability, which provides a new perspective for the diagnosis of PD.
Xia-An Bi, Xi Hu, Yiming Xie, Hao Wu

1375 related Products with: A novel CERNNE approach for predicting Parkinson's Disease-associated genes and brain regions based on multimodal imaging genetics data.

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