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#34563090   2021/09/07 To Up

Risk Intelligence as a Resource in Career Transition: The Role of College Satisfaction on the Visions about Future Jobs.

(1) Background: University transition is a critical step in career construction due to the uncertainty and unpredictability of socioeconomic conditions; these conditions compel people to manage a greater quantity of perceived risks associated with their career projects than in the past, and to face unexpected situations that could compromise their quality of life in educational and work contexts. After all, experiencing well-being during the university path can undoubtedly affect the visions of one's future work, especially when a transition period is nearby. The present study aimed to explore the role of subjective risk intelligence in expectations about future work, analyzing the potential mediational role of academic satisfaction in this relationship. (2) Methods: A longitudinal study was carried out on 352 Italian university students at the end of the degree course. We used the following measures: in T1, Subjective risk intelligence scale, College Satisfaction scale; in T2, three items assessing the expectations about future work. (3) Results: The main findings showed that subjective risk intelligence has both direct and indirect effects (through the mediation of college satisfaction) on the expectations about future work. (4) Conclusions: The ability to manage risks, also through the contribution of domain-specific satisfaction, can lead to positive expectations toward one's future work. This could increase the likelihood to perform career-related behaviors in a more proactive way if people have high risk management skills and high levels of academic satisfaction with their university path during transition.
Ernesto Lodi, Andrea Zammitti, Paola Magnano

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#34562989   2021/09/07 To Up

The Use of Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) 6 Months Post-Stroke and Their Association with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on Admission to Hospital.

Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) assess clinical outcomes from the perspective of the patient. The stroke community recommended fifteen questions for use in stroke survivors, based on the established PROMIS10 with five additional stroke-specific questions. This study aimed to determine its association with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on admission. PROM responses were taken from an existing randomised control trial and, using secondary analysis, the total score was calculated out of 100. The association between PROMs and NIHSS was estimated. Using a multivariable regression, an adjusted mean difference (aMD) in PROM total score for the baseline clinical characteristics was calculated. 343 participants (16.3%) completed the PROM; mean age 71.7 (30-94) years; 133 women (38.8%). There was a strong association between increasing NIHSS Scores on admission to hospital and worsening PROM scores at 6 months ( = 0.002). There was consistency between the NIHSS and modified Rankin score with the stroke-specific domain and total PROM scores. When adjusted, women had lower (worse) total PROM scores, with aMD = -3.85 (95% CI -6.30--1.41; = 0.002) and so did haemorrhagic strokes, with a reduction of 3.88 (95% CI -0.61-7.37; = 0.097). This study contributes to the evaluation process of this stroke-specific PROM and emphasises that stroke severity on admission correlates with poorer patient outcomes 6 months following a stroke, especially in women and those suffering haemorrhagic stroke.
Jonathan Hewitt, Natalie Bains, Katherine Wallis, Stephanie Gething, Anna Pennington, Ben Carter

1729 related Products with: The Use of Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) 6 Months Post-Stroke and Their Association with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on Admission to Hospital.

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#34562952   2021/08/24 To Up

The Effect of Forward Testing as a Function of Test Occasions and Study Material.

It has long been known that one of the most effective study techniques is to be tested on the to-be-remembered material, a phenomenon known as the testing effect. Recent research has also shown that testing of previous materials promotes the learning of new materials, a phenomenon known as the forward testing effect. In this paper, as of yet unexplored aspects of the forward testing effect related to face-name learning are examined; continuous and initial testing are compared to restudying, the effects of an initial test on subsequent learning, and whether an initial change of domain (change from one topic to another) regarding study material affects the robustness of the effect. An experiment (N = 94) was performed according to a 2 (Material: word pairs/face-name pairs in Block 1) × 3 (Test occasions: Blocks 1-4/Blocks 1 and 4/Block 4) complex between-groups design. The results showed that no difference between testing and repetition could be observed regarding the recall of faces and names. The restudy groups incorrectly recalled more names from previous lists in the last interim test compared to the tested groups, which supports the theory that interim tests reduce proactive interference. The results also suggest that the number of test occasions correlates with the number of incorrect recalls from previous lists. These results, in contrast to previous studies, highlight a potential uncertainty about the forward testing effect linked to the robustness of the phenomenon, the specificity in execution, and generalizability.
Robin Sohlberg, Fredrik Olsson, Pierre Gander

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#34562930   2021/09/15 To Up

FLIM-Based Intracellular and Extracellular pH Measurements Using Genetically Encoded pH Sensor.

The determination of pH in live cells and tissues is of high importance in physiology and cell biology. In this report, we outline the process of the creation of SypHerExtra, a genetically encoded fluorescent sensor that is capable of measuring extracellular media pH in a mildly alkaline range. SypHerExtra is a protein created by fusing the previously described pH sensor SypHer3s with the neurexin transmembrane domain that targets its expression to the cytoplasmic membrane. We showed that with excitation at 445 nm, the fluorescence lifetime of both SypHer3s and SypHerExtra strongly depend on pH. Using FLIM microscopy in live eukaryotic cells, we demonstrated that SypHerExtra can be successfully used to determine extracellular pH, while SypHer3s can be applied to measure intracellular pH. Thus, these two sensors are suitable for quantitative measurements using the FLIM method, to determine intracellular and extracellular pH in a range from pH 7.5 to 9.5 in different biological systems.
Alexander S Goryashchenko, Alexey A Pakhomov, Anastasia V Ryabova, Igor D Romanishkin, Eugene G Maksimov, Alexander N Orsa, Oxana V Serova, Andrey A Mozhaev, Margarita A Maksimova, Vladimir I Martynov, Alexander G Petrenko, Igor E Deyev

1328 related Products with: FLIM-Based Intracellular and Extracellular pH Measurements Using Genetically Encoded pH Sensor.

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#34562927   2021/09/14 To Up

A Co-Culture-Based Multiparametric Imaging Technique to Dissect Local HO Signals with Targeted HyPer7.

Multispectral live-cell imaging is an informative approach that permits detecting biological processes simultaneously in the spatial and temporal domain by exploiting spectrally distinct biosensors. However, the combination of fluorescent biosensors with distinct spectral properties such as different sensitivities, and dynamic ranges can undermine accurate co-imaging of the same analyte in different subcellular locales. We advanced a single-color multiparametric imaging method, which allows simultaneous detection of hydrogen peroxide (HO) in multiple cell locales (nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria) using the HO biosensor HyPer7. Co-culturing of endothelial cells stably expressing differentially targeted HyPer7 biosensors paved the way for co-imaging compartmentalized HO signals simultaneously in neighboring cells in a single experimental setup. We termed this approach COMPARE IT, which is an acronym for co-culture-based multiparametric imaging technique. Employing this approach, we detected lower HO levels in mitochondria of endothelial cells compared to the cell nucleus and cytosol under basal conditions. Upon administering exogenous HO, the cytosolic and nuclear-targeted probes displayed similarly slow and moderate HyPer7 responses, whereas the mitochondria-targeted HyPer7 signal plateaued faster and reached higher amplitudes. Our results indicate striking differences in mitochondrial HO accumulation of endothelial cells. Here, we present the method's potential as a practicable and informative multiparametric live-cell imaging technique.
Melike Secilmis, Hamza Yusuf Altun, Johannes Pilic, Yusuf Ceyhun Erdogan, Zeynep Cokluk, Busra Nur Ata, Gulsah Sevimli, Asal Ghaffari Zaki, Esra Nur Yigit, Gürkan Öztürk, Roland Malli, Emrah Eroglu

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#34562897   2021/08/30 To Up

Super-Resolution Imaging with Graphene.

Super-resolution optical imaging is a consistent research hotspot for promoting studies in nanotechnology and biotechnology due to its capability of overcoming the diffraction limit, which is an intrinsic obstacle in pursuing higher resolution for conventional microscopy techniques. In the past few decades, a great number of techniques in this research domain have been theoretically proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Graphene, a special two-dimensional material, has become the most meritorious candidate and attracted incredible attention in high-resolution imaging domain due to its distinctive properties. In this article, the working principle of graphene-assisted imaging devices is summarized, and recent advances of super-resolution optical imaging based on graphene are reviewed for both near-field and far-field applications.
Xiaoxiao Jiang, Lu Kong, Yu Ying, Qiongchan Gu, Jiangtao Lv, Zhigao Dai, Guangyuan Si

1687 related Products with: Super-Resolution Imaging with Graphene.

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#34562852   2021/09/18 To Up

QSAR-guided pharmacophoric modeling reveals important structural requirements for Polo kinase 1 (Plk1) inhibitors.

Targeting Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) by molecular inhibitors is being a promising approach for tumor therapy. Nevertheless, insufficient methodical analyses have been done to characterize the interactions inside the Plk1 binding pocket. In this study, an extensive combined ligand and structure-based drug design workflow was conducted to data-mine the structural requirements for Plk1 inhibition. Consequently, the binding modes of 368 previously known Plk1 inhibitors were investigated by pharmacophore generation technique. The resulted pharmacophores were engaged in the context of Genetic function algorithm (GFA) and Multiple linear regression (MLR) analyses to search for a prognostic QSAR model. The most successful QSAR model was with statistical criteria of (r = 0.76, radj = 0.76, rpred = 0.75, Q = 0.73). Our QSAR-selected pharmacophores were validated by Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Later on, the best QSAR model and its associated pharmacophoric hypotheses (HypoB-T4-5, HypoI-T2-7, HypoD-T4-3, and HypoC-T3-3) were used to identify new Plk1 inhibitory hits retrieved from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) database. The most potent hits exhibited experimental anti-Plk1 IC of 1.49, 3.79. 5.26 and 6.35 μM. Noticeably, our hits, were found to interact with the Plk1 kinase domain through some important amino acid residues namely, Cys67, Lys82, Cys133, Phe183, and Asp194.
Rand Shahin, Nabil N Al-Hashimi, Nour El-Huda Daoud, Salah Aljamal, Omar Shaheen

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#34562851   2021/09/17 To Up

E484K mutation in SARS-CoV-2 RBD enhances binding affinity with hACE2 but reduces interactions with neutralizing antibodies and nanobodies: Binding free energy calculation studies.

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Wei Bu Wang, Yu Liang, Yu Qin Jin, Jing Zhang, Ji Guo Su, Qi Ming Li

1100 related Products with: E484K mutation in SARS-CoV-2 RBD enhances binding affinity with hACE2 but reduces interactions with neutralizing antibodies and nanobodies: Binding free energy calculation studies.

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#34562833   2021/09/22 To Up

Alteration of power law scaling of spontaneous brain activity in schizophrenia.

Nonlinear dynamical analysis has been used to quantify the complexity of brain signal at temporal scales. Power law scaling is a well-validated method in physics that has been used to describe the dynamics of a system in the frequency domain, ranging from noisy oscillation to complex fluctuations. In this research, we investigated the power-law characteristics in a large-scale resting-state fMRI data of schizophrenia and healthy participants derived from Taiwan Aging and Mental Illness cohort. We extracted the power spectral density (PSD) of resting signal by Fourier transform. Power law scaling of PSD was estimated by determining the slope of the regression line fitting to the logarithm of PSD. t-Test was used to assess the statistical difference in power law scaling between schizophrenia and healthy participants. The significant differences in power law scaling were found in six brain regions. Schizophrenia patients have significantly more positive power law scaling (i.e., more homogenous frequency components) at four brain regions: left precuneus, left medial dorsal nucleus, right inferior frontal gyrus, and right middle temporal gyrus and less positive power law scaling (i.e., more dominant at lower frequency range) in bilateral putamen compared with healthy participants. Moreover, significant correlations of power law scaling with the severity of psychosis were found. These findings suggest that schizophrenia has abnormal brain signal complexity linked to psychotic symptoms. The power law scaling represents the dynamical properties of resting-state fMRI signal may serve as a novel functional brain imaging marker for evaluating patients with mental illness.
Yi-Ju Lee, Su-Yun Huang, Ching-Po Lin, Shih-Jen Tsai, Albert C Yang

1498 related Products with: Alteration of power law scaling of spontaneous brain activity in schizophrenia.

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#34562831   2021/09/14 To Up

The photo-thermochemical properties and functions of Marchantia phototropin encoded by an unduplicated gene in land plant evolution.

Phototropin (phot) is a blue light photoreceptor in plants and possesses two photosensory light‑oxygen-voltage (LOV1 and LOV2) domains with different photo-thermochemical properties. While liverworts contain a single copy of PHOT (e.g., MpPHOT in Marchantia polymorpha), many land plant species contain multicopy PHOT genes (e.g., AtPHOT1 and 2 in Arabidopsis thaliana) due to evolutionary gene duplication. The LOV domains of duplicated phot proteins have been studied in detail, but those of single-copy phot proteins remain to be characterized. As phot has not been duplicated in liverworts, we hypothesized that Mpphot may retain the ancestral function and photo-thermochemical properties. To learn more about the unduplicated phot proteins, we analyzed chloroplast relocation movement and the photo-thermochemical properties of LOV1 and LOV2 in Mpphot (Mpphot-LOV1 and Mpphot-LOV2, respectively). The function of Mpphot-LOV1, which induced a response to move chloroplasts to weak light (the accumulation response) in the absence of photoactive LOV2, differed from that of LOV1 of the duplicated phot proteins of A. thaliana (e.g., Atphot1-LOV1 preventing the accumulation response). On the other hand, the function of Mpphot-LOV2 was similar to that of LOV2 of the duplicated phots. The photo-thermochemical properties of Mpphot were a hybrid of those of the duplicated phots; the photochemical and thermochemical reactions of Mpphot were similar to those of the phot2- and phot1-type proteins, respectively. Our findings reveal conservation and diversification among LOV domains during phot duplication events in land plant evolution.
Shota Kato, Yamato Takahashi, Yuta Fujii, Kotoko Sasaki, Satoyuki Hirano, Koji Okajima, Yutaka Kodama

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