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#33073913   2020/10/19 To Up

Priming for enhanced ARGONAUTE2 activation accompanies induced resistance to cucumber mosaic virus in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a broad-spectrum disease resistance response that can be induced upon infection from pathogens or by chemical treatment, such as with benzo-(1,2,3)-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH). SAR involves priming for more robust activation of defence genes upon pathogen attack. Whether priming for SAR would involve components of RNA silencing remained unknown. Here, we show that upon leaf infiltration of water, BTH-primed Arabidopsis thaliana plants accumulate higher amounts of mRNA of ARGONAUTE (AGO)2 and AGO3, key components of RNA silencing. The enhanced AGO2 expression is associated with prior-to-activation trimethylation of lysine 4 in histone H3 and acetylation of histone H3 in the AGO2 promoter and with induced resistance to the yellow strain of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV[Y]). The results suggest that priming A. thaliana for enhanced defence involves modification of histones in the AGO2 promoter that condition AGO2 for enhanced activation, associated with resistance to CMV(Y). Consistently, the fold-reduction in CMV(Y) coat protein accumulation by BTH pretreatment was lower in ago2 than in wild type, pointing to reduced capacity of ago2 to activate BTH-induced CMV(Y) resistance. A role of AGO2 in pathogen-induced SAR is suggested by the enhanced activation of AGO2 after infiltrating systemic leaves of plants expressing a localized hypersensitive response upon CMV(Y) infection. In addition, local inoculation of SAR-inducing Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola causes systemic priming for enhanced AGO2 expression. Together our results indicate that defence priming targets the AGO2 component of RNA silencing whose enhanced expression is likely to contribute to SAR.
Sugihiro Ando, Michal Jaskiewicz, Sei Mochizuki, Saeko Koseki, Shuhei Miyashita, Hideki Takahashi, Uwe Conrath

1015 related Products with: Priming for enhanced ARGONAUTE2 activation accompanies induced resistance to cucumber mosaic virus in Arabidopsis thaliana.

2ug5ug100 100ug100ug100 µg25100 200 25 1 mL50 ul

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#33073812   2020/10/19 To Up

Industrial carbon dioxide capture and utilization: state of the art and future challenges.

Dramatically increased CO2 concentration from several point sources is perceived to cause severe greenhouse effect towards the serious ongoing global warming with associated climate destabilization, inducing undesirable natural calamities, melting of glaciers, and extreme weather patterns. CO2 capture and utilization (CCU) has received tremendous attention due to its significant role in intensifying global warming. Considering the lack of a timely review on the state-of-the-art progress of promising CCU techniques, developing an appropriate and prompt summary of such advanced techniques with a comprehensive understanding is necessary. Thus, it is imperative to provide a timely review, given the fast growth of sophisticated CO2 capture and utilization materials and their implementation. In this work, we critically summarized and comprehensively reviewed the characteristics and performance of both liquid and solid CO2 adsorbents with possible schemes for the improvement of their CO2 capture ability and advances in CO2 utilization. Their industrial applications in pre- and post-combustion CO2 capture as well as utilization were systematically discussed and compared. With our great effort, this review would be of significant importance for academic researchers for obtaining an overall understanding of the current developments and future trends of CCU. This work is bound to benefit researchers in fields relating to CCU and facilitate the progress of significant breakthroughs in both fundamental research and commercial applications to deliver perspective views for future scientific and industrial advances in CCU.
Wanlin Gao, Shuyu Liang, Rujie Wang, Qian Jiang, Yu Zhang, Qianwen Zheng, Bingqiao Xie, Cui Ying Toe, Xuancan Zhu, Junya Wang, Liang Huang, Yanshan Gao, Zheng Wang, Changbum Jo, Qiang Wang, Lidong Wang, Yuefeng Liu, Benoit Louis, Jason Scott, Anne-Cecile Roger, Rose Amal, Hong He, Sang-Eon Park

2672 related Products with: Industrial carbon dioxide capture and utilization: state of the art and future challenges.

500 MG25 mg10 mg50 mg100ug25 mg200 96T200ug10 mg100ul100ug

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#33073635   2020/10/17 To Up

Effects of the signal modulation on the response of human fibroblasts to in vitro stimulation with subthermal RF currents.

Capacitive-Resistive Electric Transfer (CRET) thermotherapies aim at tissue repair and regeneration through non-invasive application of RF currents. We have reported that the cellular response to subthermal CRET currents is non-linearly dependent on the signal frequency, and that in vitro exposure to a 448-kHz CRET signal promotes ADSC proliferation, as well as collagen and glycosaminoglycan synthesis in prechondrocytic cells. The present work investigates the response of neonatal fibroblasts to subthermal exposure (100 µA/mm) to two CRET signals: a 448-kHz, non-modulated sinusoidal wave vs. a 20-kHz amplitude-modulation of the 448-kHz carrier. To that end, cell proliferation and expression of the biomarkers Hsp47, Hsp27 and decorin were assessed by cell count, PCNA and Western blotting. The results revealed that while both signals significantly and equivalently increased early (4 h) expression of Hsp47, the modulated signal was more efficient in inducing Hsp27 and decorin overexpression and promoting cell proliferation. These data indicate that the cellular response is dependent on the RF signal modulation and suggest that the therapeutic effects of CRET could be mediated by promotion of fibroblastic proliferation and overexpression of biomarkers that are essential in skin regeneration.
María Ángeles Trillo, María Antonia Martínez, Alejandro Úbeda

1744 related Products with: Effects of the signal modulation on the response of human fibroblasts to in vitro stimulation with subthermal RF currents.

100 UG100 1021mg 100ul100 μg

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#33073269   2020/10/19 To Up

Rheological investigation of collagen, fibrinogen, and thrombin solutions for drop-on-demand 3D bioprinting.

Collagen, fibrinogen, and thrombin proteins in aqueous buffer solutions are widely used as precursors of natural biopolymers in three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting applications. The proteins are sourced from animals and their quality may vary from batch to batch, inducing differences in the rheological properties of such solutions. In this work, we investigate the rheological response of collagen, fibrinogen, and thrombin protein solutions in bulk and at the solution/air interface. Interfacial rheological measurements show that fibrous collagen, fibrinogen and globular thrombin proteins adsorb and aggregate at the solution/air interface, forming a viscoelastic solid film at the interface. The viscoelastic film corrupts the bulk rheological measurements in rotational rheometers by contributing to an apparent yield stress, which increases the apparent bulk viscosity up to shear rates as high as 1000 s-1. The addition of a non-ionic surfactant, such as polysorbate 80 (PS80) in small amounts between 0.001 and 0.1 v/v%, prevents the formation of the interfacial layer, allowing the estimation of true bulk viscosity of the solutions. The estimation of viscosity not only helps in identifying those protein solutions that are potentially printable with drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet printing but also detects inconsistencies in flow behavior among the batches.
Hemanth Gudapati, Daniele Parisi, Ralph H Colby, Ibrahim T Ozbolat

1029 related Products with: Rheological investigation of collagen, fibrinogen, and thrombin solutions for drop-on-demand 3D bioprinting.

100ug100ug Lyophilized 100ul500 1mg1,000 tests

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#33073250   2020/09/15 To Up

Doxorubicin-Induced Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction in Conduit Arteries Is Prevented by Mitochondrial-Specific Antioxidant Treatment.

Doxorubicin (DOXO) chemotherapy increases risk for cardiovascular disease in part by inducing endothelial dysfunction in conduit arteries. However, the mechanisms mediating DOXO-associated endothelial dysfunction in (intact) arteries and treatment strategies are not established.
Zachary S Clayton, Vienna E Brunt, David A Hutton, Nicholas S VanDongen, Angelo D'Alessandro, Julie A Reisz, Brian P Ziemba, Douglas R Seals

1353 related Products with: Doxorubicin-Induced Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction in Conduit Arteries Is Prevented by Mitochondrial-Specific Antioxidant Treatment.

100 ul50 ul50 ul100 ul25 µg0.1ml100 μg100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized4 Arrays/Slide

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#33073244   2020/10/09 To Up

Imperfect storm: is interleukin-33 the Achilles heel of COVID-19?

The unique cytokine signature of COVID-19 might provide clues to disease mechanisms and possible future therapies. Here, we propose a pathogenic model in which the alarmin cytokine, interleukin (IL)-33, is a key player in driving all stages of COVID-19 disease (ie, asymptomatic, mild-moderate, severe-critical, and chronic-fibrotic). In susceptible individuals, IL-33 release by damaged lower respiratory cells might induce dysregulated GATA-binding factor 3-expressing regulatory T cells, thereby breaking immune tolerance and eliciting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-induced autoinflammatory lung disease. Such disease might be initially sustained by IL-33-differentiated type-2 innate lymphoid cells and locally expanded γδ T cells. In severe COVID-19 cases, the IL-33-ST2 axis might act to expand the number of pathogenic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-expressing T cells, dampen antiviral interferon responses, elicit hyperinflammation, and favour thromboses. In patients who survive severe COVID-19, IL-33 might drive pulmonary fibrosis by inducing myofibroblasts and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We discuss the therapeutic implications of these hypothetical pathways, including use of therapies that target IL-33 (eg, anti-ST2), T helper 17-like γδ T cells, immune cell homing, and cytokine balance.
Gaetano Zizzo, Philip L Cohen

2729 related Products with: Imperfect storm: is interleukin-33 the Achilles heel of COVID-19?

0.1 mg 100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized 1 G100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100 ul100ug Lyophilized 0.1 mg 100ug100ug Lyophilized 100ul

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#33073111   2020/10/02 To Up

A Translational Study of a Silicon Phthalocyanine Substituted with a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor for Photodynamic Therapy.

In this study, we synthesized and characterized a silicon phthalocyanine substituted with 3-hydroxypyridin-2-thione (), designed to be a chemophotodynamic therapy agent acting as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and we determined its photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological properties. Next, we evaluated its anticancer efficacy on MCF-7, double positive and MDA-MB-231, triple negative breast cancer cell lines, as well as on a healthy human endothelial cell line (HUVEC). Our results indicate that can target nucleoli of cells, effectively inducing apoptosis while promoting cell cycle arrest thanks to its high singlet oxygen yield and its histone deacetylase downregulating properties, suggesting a powerful anticancer effect on breast cancer . Our further studies will be conducted with primary breast cancer cell culture to give a better insight into the anticancer mechanism of the compound.
Başak Aru, Aysel Günay, Elif Şenkuytu, Gülderen Yanıkkaya Demirel, Ayşe Gül Gürek, Devrim Atilla

1420 related Products with: A Translational Study of a Silicon Phthalocyanine Substituted with a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor for Photodynamic Therapy.

100ul100 ul100.00 ug5 mg10 mg100 100 ul48 assays 100 assays

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#33072765   2020/09/22 To Up

Structure and Emerging Functions of LRCH Proteins in Leukocyte Biology.

Actin-dependent leukocyte trafficking and activation are critical for immune surveillance under steady state conditions and during disease states. Proper immune surveillance is of utmost importance in mammalian homeostasis and it ensures the defense against pathogen intruders, but it also guarantees tissue integrity through the continuous removal of dying cells or the elimination of tumor cells. On the cellular level, these processes depend on the precise reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton orchestrating, e.g., cell polarization, migration, and vesicular dynamics in leukocytes. The fine-tuning of the actin cytoskeleton is achieved by a multiplicity of actin-binding proteins inducing, e.g., the organization of the actin cytoskeleton or linking the cytoskeleton to membranes and their receptors. More than a decade ago, the family of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) and calponin homology (CH) domain-containing (LRCH) proteins has been identified as cytoskeletal regulators. The LRR domains are important for protein-protein interactions and the CH domains mediate actin binding. LRR and CH domains are frequently found in many proteins, but strikingly the simultaneous expression of both domains in one protein only occurs in the LRCH protein family. To date, one LRCH protein has been described in drosophila and four LRCH proteins have been identified in the murine and the human system. The function of LRCH proteins is still under investigation. Recently, LRCH proteins have emerged as novel players in leukocyte function. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of LRCH proteins with a special emphasis on their function in leukocyte biology.
Thibaud Rivière, Almke Bader, Kristin Pogoda, Barbara Walzog, Daniela Maier-Begandt

1026 related Products with: Structure and Emerging Functions of LRCH Proteins in Leukocyte Biology.

101 mg1050 101025mg1mg1mg1 mg5002

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#33072723   2020/09/23 To Up

Quantifying the Role of Lysine in Prion Replication by Nano-LC Mass Spectrometry and Bioassay.

Prions propagate by a template driven process, inducing the normal cellular isoform (PrP) to adopt the prion (PrP) conformation. In PrP, the positions of lysines are highly conserved and strongly influence prion propagation. In this study, covalent modification was used to quantitate the role of lysines in the PrP template that drives prion replication. The ε-amino group of lysines in the PrP (hamster-adapted scrapie Sc237) template was acetylated by either acetic anhydride (AcO) or the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of acetic acid (Ac-NHS). The extent of lysine acetylation in PrP was quantitated by mass spectrometry or Western blot-based analysis. Identical samples were bioassayed to quantitate the loss of infectivity associated with lysine acetylation. The reduction of infectivity at the highest reagent concentration was approximately 90% (∼10-fold). Ten of the eleven prion lysines were acetylated to a greater extent (25-400-fold) than the observed loss of infectivity. Only one lysine, at position 220 (K), had a reactivity that is consistent with the loss of infectivity. Although lysines are highly conserved and play a crucial role in converting PrP into the PrP conformation, once that conformation is adopted, the lysines present in the PrP template play only a limited role in prion replication. In principle, this approach could be used to clarify the role of other amino acids in the replication of prions and other prion-like protein misfolding diseases.
Christopher J Silva, Melissa L Erickson-Beltran, Irina C Dynin

2445 related Products with: Quantifying the Role of Lysine in Prion Replication by Nano-LC Mass Spectrometry and Bioassay.

100 UG100 μg1

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#33072493   2019/11/20 To Up

cancer vaccines: bridging innate and adaptive immunity.

Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising cancer treatment, however success in only select clinical indications underscores the need for novel approaches. Recently based vaccines have been developed to drive tumor specific T-cell responses. Here, we discuss recent preclinical studies using vaccines, innate immune pathways that influence T-cell priming, and new vaccine strategies in clinical trials.
Zachary T Morrow, Zachary M Powers, John-Demian Sauer

2114 related Products with: cancer vaccines: bridging innate and adaptive immunity.

100ug5mgEach

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