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#32650355   2020/06/27 To Up

Antirheumatic drugs for COVID-19 treatment based on the phases of the disease: Current concept.

COVID-19 disease is the most recent pandemic, since it has affected more than four and a half million people and caused more than 300,000 deaths. It is a very complex systemic disease in terms of pathogenesis, treatment, and prognosis. Pharmacological treatment may include antiviral and antimalarial drugs, antibiotics, monoclonal antibodies, corticosteroids as well as low-molecular-weight heparins to prevent the evolution of the disease from reaching the severe inflammatory phase that can lead to respiratory complications, multiple organ failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and finally death. Therefore, pending the development of the much sought-after vaccine, there needs to be a multidisciplinary approach to tackling this disease, and it is essential to use different medical treatments at the correct pathogenic moment. The aim of this article is to evaluate the rationale and reason behind the use of antirheumatic drugs, by expert point of view, in the various phases of the disease. Another important aspect in the management of the disease is to identify patients at high risk, both to change their lifestyle and to correct the state of their health through non-pharmacological measures for improving their immuno-balance. Our literature review reveals the important role and the therapeutic potential of antirheumatic agents in preventing the progression of the disease and aiding recovery from the disease. However, there is a lack of clinical evidence to support the use of these agents, indicating that further randomized controlled studies are required.
Marco Valentini, Hassan Zmerly

2613 related Products with: Antirheumatic drugs for COVID-19 treatment based on the phases of the disease: Current concept.

101100 IU0.1 mg500 Units1 ml2

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#32650354   2020/06/29 To Up

Obesity and Higher Risk for Severe Complications of Covid-19: What to do when the two pandemics meet.

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has spread around the globe, infecting more than ten million individuals, with more than 500,000 dead; about one half of the infected people have recovered. Despite this fact, a subgroup of individuals affected by COVID-19 is at greater risk of developing worse outcomes and experience a high rate of mortality. Data on the association between obesity and COVID-19 are growing; the available studies, have reported a high prevalence of overweight and obesity in patients experiencing a severe COVID-19 course, with serious complications requiring hospitalization and admission to intensive care units. This paper attempts to highlight potential mechanisms behind the greater vulnerability to COVID-19 of individuals with obesity. The presence of uncontrolled chronic obesity-related comorbidities, particularly pulmonary diseases, can present a primary fertile soil for respiratory tract infection. Combined with immune system impairments, such as alteration in the T-cell proliferation and macrophage differentiation, and the high pro-inflammatory cytokine production by the adipose organ, this may worsen the general condition toward a systemic diffusion of infection. Prevention remains the first line of intervention in these patients that can be achieved by adhering to social distancing and adopting hygiene precautions, combined with a healthy lifestyle. Patients with obesity require preferential access dedicated to primary care services to ensure they are regularly taking their medications for the treatment of any concurrent chronic diseases. Finally, their physicians must promptly manage any medical signs or symptoms in the case of suspected severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV2) infection to prevent the risk of severe outcomes.
Alessandra Valerio, Enzo Nisoli, Andrea P Rossi, Massimo Pellegrini, Tiziana Todesco, Marwan El Ghoch

1973 related Products with: Obesity and Higher Risk for Severe Complications of Covid-19: What to do when the two pandemics meet.

100μg 1 G100μg2.5 mg 1 G 100 G

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#32650237   2020/06/10 To Up

METTL3 Induces AAA Development and Progression by Modulating N6-Methyladenosine-Dependent Primary miR34a Processing.

Identifying effective drugs to delay the progression of aortic aneurysms is a formidable challenge in vascular medicine. Methyltransferase-like 3 (METTL3) plays a key role in catalyzing the formation of N6-methyladenosine (mA), but despite the functional importance of METTL3 and mA in various fundamental biological processes, their roles in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are unknown. Here, we found that METTL3 knockdown in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE) mice treated with angiotensin II suppressed the formation of AAAs, while METTL3 overexpression exerted the opposite effects. Similar results were obtained in a calcium chloride (CaCl)-induced mouse AAA model. Mechanistically, METTL3-dependent mA methylation promoted primary microRNA-34a (miR-34a, pri-miR34a) maturation through DGCR8. Moreover, miR-34a overexpression significantly decreased SIRT1 expression and aggravated AAA formation, while miR-34a deficiency produced the opposite effects. In a rescue experiment, miR-34a knockdown or forced expression of SIRT1 partially attenuated the protective effects of METTL3 deficiency against AAA formation. Our studies reveal an important role for METTL3/mA-mediated miR-34a maturation in AAA formation and provide a novel therapeutic target and diagnostic biomarker for AAA treatment.
Lintao Zhong, Xiang He, Haoyu Song, Yili Sun, Guojun Chen, Xiaoyun Si, Jie Sun, Xiaoqiang Chen, Wangjun Liao, Yulin Liao, Jianping Bin

1068 related Products with: METTL3 Induces AAA Development and Progression by Modulating N6-Methyladenosine-Dependent Primary miR34a Processing.

1000 100ug100ug1 100ul0.1ml (1mg/ml)100ug Lyophilized1 g100ug100ug

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#32650142   2020/07/07 To Up

The Impact of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs on Older Adult Trauma Patients With Hip Fractures.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use is frequently recommended for multimodal analgesia to reduce opioid use. We hypothesized that increased NSAID utilization will decrease opioid requirements without leading to significant complications in older adult trauma patients undergoing hip fracture repair.
Krista L Haines, Matthew Fuller, Justin G Vaughan, Vijay Krishnamoorthy, Karthik Raghunathan, George Kasotakis, Suresh Agarwal, Tetsu Ohnuma

1977 related Products with: The Impact of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs on Older Adult Trauma Patients With Hip Fractures.

100ug Lyophilized0.2 mg100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100 μg100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized100ug Lyophilized

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#32650092   2020/07/07 To Up

Comparative transcriptome and metabolomic profiling reveal the complex mechanisms underlying the developmental dynamics of tobacco leaves.

Although the leaf is the most important photosynthetic organ in most plants, many of the molecular mechanisms underlying leaf developmental dynamics remain to be explored. To better understand the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involved in leaf development, we conducted comparative transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis of leaves from seven positions on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. A total of 35,622 unique differentially expressed genes and 79 metabolites were identified. A time-series expression analysis detected two interesting transcriptional profiles, one comprising 10,197 genes that displayed continual up-regulation during leaf development and another comprising 4696 genes that displayed continual down-regulation. Combining these data with co-expression network results identified four important regulatory networks involved in photorespiration and the tricarboxylic acid cycle; these networks may regulate carbon/nitrogen balance during leaf development. We also found that the transcription factor NtGATA5 acts as a hub associated with C and N metabolism and chloroplast development during leaf development through regulation of phytohormones. Furthermore, we investigated the transcriptional dynamics of genes involved in the auxin, cytokinin, and jasmonic acid biosynthesis and signaling pathways during tobacco leaf development. Overall, our study greatly expands the understanding of the regulatory network controlling developmental dynamics in plant leaves.
Wei Chang, Huina Zhao, Shizhou Yu, Jing Yu, Kai Cai, Wei Sun, Xumei Liu, Xiaodong Li, Mengna Yu, Shahzad Ali, Kai Zhang, Cunmin Qu, Bo Lei, Kun Lu

2452 related Products with: Comparative transcriptome and metabolomic profiling reveal the complex mechanisms underlying the developmental dynamics of tobacco leaves.

1500 Units1250 IU100.00 ul1 ml1500 Units

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#32650064   2020/07/01 To Up

Anti-diabetic properties of genistein-chromium (III) complex in db/db diabetic mice and its sub-acute toxicity evaluation in normal mice.

In this study, chromium (III) complex was synthesized from genistein (GEN) which had good hypoglycemic activity and inorganic chromium (III) element, and its hypoglycemic activity and sub-acute toxicity were studied.
Pengshou Li, Yujia Cao, Ge Song, Baosheng Zhao, Qixiang Ma, Ziyong Li, Chaojun He

2782 related Products with: Anti-diabetic properties of genistein-chromium (III) complex in db/db diabetic mice and its sub-acute toxicity evaluation in normal mice.

50 ul

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#32650018   2020/07/07 To Up

INCIDENCE OF PELVIC FLOOR DISORDERS IN US ARMY FEMALE SOLDIERS.

To determine the incidence of pelvic floor disorders (PFD) among active-duty US Army female soldiers.
Lisa J Rogo-Gupta, D Alan Nelson, Nichole Young-Lin, Jonathan G Shaw, Lianne M Kurina

2309 related Products with: INCIDENCE OF PELVIC FLOOR DISORDERS IN US ARMY FEMALE SOLDIERS.

100 μg100 μg100 μg1 set100 μg20 µl (10 mM)96 tests100 μg100.00 ug100ug

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#32650004   2020/07/07 To Up

Eicosanoids: the Overlooked Storm in COVID-19?

Severe coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) symptoms, including systemic inflammatory response and multi-system organ failure, are now affecting thousands of infected patients and causing widespread mortality. Coronavirus infection causes tissue damage, which triggers the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response and subsequent eicosanoid and cytokine storms. While pro-inflammatory eicosanoids including prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes are critical mediators of physiological processes such as inflammation, fever, allergy, and pain, their role in COVID-19 are poorly characterized. Arachidonic acid derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) could alleviate the systemic hyper-inflammatory response in COVID-19 infection by modulating ER stress and stimulating the resolution of inflammation. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors, which increase endogenous EET levels, exhibit potent anti-inflammatory activity and inhibit various pathologic processes in preclinical disease models including pulmonary fibrosis, thrombosis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Therefore, targeting eicosanoids and sEH could be a novel therapeutic approach in combating COVID-19. In this review, we discuss the predominant role of eicosanoids in regulating the inflammatory cascade and propose the potential application of sEH inhibitors in alleviating COVID-19 symptoms. We also discuss the host-protective action of omega-3 fatty acid-derived epoxyeicosanoids and specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs) in regulating anti-inflammation and anti-viral response. Future studies determining the eicosanoid profile in COVID-19 patient or preclinical model are pivotal in providing the novel insight of coronavirus-host interaction and inflammation modulation.
Bruce D Hammock, Weicang Wang, Molly M Gilligan, Dipak Panigrahy

2375 related Products with: Eicosanoids: the Overlooked Storm in COVID-19?

16 inhibitors100 μg100 µl (2 mM)

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