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Comparison of HE 4, CA 125, ROMA score and ultrasound score in the differential diagnosis of ovarian masses.

To compare the value of USG score, cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), human epididymis protein 4 (HE 4) and risk of malignancy algorithm (ROMA) in differential diagnosis ovarian masses.

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Diagnostic Accuracy of Non-Invasive Tests to Detect Advanced Hepatic Fibrosis in Patients With Hepatitis C and End-Stage Renal Disease.

For patients with liver disease from hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection complicated by end-stage renal disease (ESRD), it is important to assess liver fibrosis before kidney transplantation. We evaluated the accuracy of non-invasive tests to identify advanced hepatic fibrosis in patients with HCV and ESRD.

1459 related Products with: Diagnostic Accuracy of Non-Invasive Tests to Detect Advanced Hepatic Fibrosis in Patients With Hepatitis C and End-Stage Renal Disease.

Renal disease spectrum ti FDA Standard Frozen Tissu Mid advanced stage ovary Advanced kidney cancer ti Brain disease spectrum (b Beta Amyloid (40) ELISA K Breast disease spectrum t Advanced colon tumor tiss Lung disease spectrum tis Ovary disease spectrum (o Advanced lung cancer and Breast disease spectrum t

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Identifying and removing widespread signal deflections from fMRI data: Rethinking the global signal regression problem.

One of the most controversial procedures in the analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data is global signal regression (GSR): the removal, via linear regression, of the mean signal averaged over the entire brain. On one hand, the global mean signal contains variance associated with respiratory, scanner-, and motion-related artifacts, and its removal via GSR improves various quality-control metrics, enhances the anatomical specificity of functional-connectivity patterns, and can increase the behavioral variance explained by such patterns. On the other hand, GSR alters the distribution of regional signal correlations in the brain, can induce artifactual anticorrelations, may remove real neural signal, and can distort case-control comparisons of functional-connectivity measures. Global signal fluctuations can be identified visually from a matrix of colour-coded signal intensities, called a carpet plot, in which rows represent voxels and columns represent time. Prior to GSR, large, periodic bands of coherent signal changes that affect most of the brain are often apparent; after GSR, these apparently global changes are greatly diminished. Here, using three independent datasets, we show that reordering carpet plots to emphasize cluster structure in the data reveals a greater diversity of spatially widespread signal deflections (WSDs) than previously thought. Their precise form varies across time and participants, and GSR is only effective in removing specific kinds of WSDs. We present an alternative, iterative correction method called Diffuse Cluster Estimation and Regression (DiCER), that identifies representative signals associated with large clusters of coherent voxels. DiCER is more effective than GSR at removing diverse WSDs as visualized in carpet plots, reduces correlations between functional connectivity and head-motion estimates, reduces inter-individual variability in global correlation structure, and results in comparable or improved identification of canonical functional-connectivity networks. Using task fMRI data across 47 contrasts from 7 tasks in the Human Connectome Project, we also present evidence that DiCER is more successful than GSR in preserving the spatial structure of expected task-related activation patterns. Our findings indicate that care must be exercised when examining WSDs (and their possible removal) in rsfMRI data, and that DiCER is a viable alternative to GSR for removing anatomically widespread and temporally coherent signals. All code for implementing DiCER and replicating our results is available at https://github.com/BMHLab/DiCER.

2219 related Products with: Identifying and removing widespread signal deflections from fMRI data: Rethinking the global signal regression problem.



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Regional myocardial strain by cardiac magnetic resonance feature tracking for detection of scar in ischemic heart disease.

Although cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) can accurately quantify global left ventricular strain using feature tracking (FT), it has been suggested that FT cannot reliably quantify regional strain. We aimed to determine whether abnormalities in regional strain measured using FT can be detected within areas of myocardial scar and to determine the extent to which the regional strain measurement is impacted by LV ejection fraction (EF).

1303 related Products with: Regional myocardial strain by cardiac magnetic resonance feature tracking for detection of scar in ischemic heart disease.

Colon disease spectrum (c Renal disease spectrum ti rHIV gp36, insoluble Anti Small intestine disease ( Lung disease spectrum tis Breast disease spectrum t Beta Amyloid (1 40) ELISA Beta Amyloid (1 40) ELISA Cervical intraepithelial Skin disease tissue array Multiple lung carcinoma ( Heart disease and normal

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Automatic detection and classification of protruding lesions in wireless capsule endoscopy images based on a deep convolutional neural network.

Protruding lesions of the small bowel vary in wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) images, and their automatic detection may be difficult. We aimed to develop and test a deep learning-based system to automatically detect protruding lesions of various types in WCE images.

2953 related Products with: Automatic detection and classification of protruding lesions in wireless capsule endoscopy images based on a deep convolutional neural network.

MarkerGeneTM Fluorescent Rabbit Anti-FGF3 Oncogene MarkerGeneTM in vivo lacZ Resorufin Oleate, Fluorog ERK Signaling Phospho-Spe Rabbit Anti-Integrin alph Malignant melanoma, metas STAT1 & STAT3 Protein Pro Goat Anti-Human, Mouse, R Aurora Kinase B Inhibitor Goat Anti- STAG3 (mouse), Homogenizer for 8 samples

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It's about Time: Insights into the Modes of Action of Antimalarials.

In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, Murithi et al. (2020) integrate stage-specific phenotypic screening and metabolomics to uncover modes of action of antimalarials. This work highlights compounds with potent activity against all asexual blood stages, as well as compounds with unique stage specificity and metabolic profiles.

2437 related Products with: It's about Time: Insights into the Modes of Action of Antimalarials.

FDA Standard Frozen Tissu Normal rat multiple organ Salmonella Real Time PCR FDA Standard Frozen Tissu TCP-1 theta antibody Sour Advanced Wearable Elderly FDA Standard Frozen Tissu Normal rat multiple organ Pfu DNA Polymerase protei Salmonella Real Time PCR Normal mouse multiple org MultiGene Gradient therm

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Predictive tools to determine risk of infection in kidney transplant recipients.

: Infection represents a major complication after kidney transplantation (KT). Therapeutic drug monitoring is essentially the only approach for the adjustment of immunosuppression in current practice, with suboptimal results. The implementation of immune monitoring strategies may contribute to minimizing the risk of adverse events attributable to over-immunosuppression without compromising graft outcomes.: The present review (based on PubMed/MEDLINE searches from database inception to November 2019) is focused on immune biomarkers with no antigen specificity (non-pathogen-specific), including serum levels of immunoglobulins and complement factors, peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations, soluble CD30, intracellular ATP production by stimulated CD4 T-cells, and other cell-based immune assays. We also summarized recent advances in the use of replication kinetics of latent viruses to assess the functionality of T-cell immunity, with focus on the non-pathogenic anelloviruses. Finally, the composite risk scores reported in the literature are critically discussed.: Notable efforts have been made to develop an enlarging repertoire of immune biomarkers and prediction models, although most of them still lack technical standardization and external validation. Preventive interventions based on these tools (prolongation of prophylaxis, tapering of immunosuppression, or immunoglobulin replacement therapy in hypogammaglobulinemic patients) remain to be defined, ideally in the context of controlled trials.

2172 related Products with: Predictive tools to determine risk of infection in kidney transplant recipients.

FDA Standard Frozen Tissu Kidney cancer survey tiss Kidney disease spectrum ( Multiple types of kidney Kidney clear cell carcino Kidney cancer tissue arra Kidney cancer test tissue Kidney cancer tissue arra Goat Anti-Human TOM1L1 SR Kidney cancer tissue arra Kidney cancer tissue arra Kidney tumor tissue array

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The acid-base-nucleophile catalytic triad in ABH-fold enzymes is coordinated by a set of structural elements.

The alpha/beta-Hydrolases (ABH) are a structural class of proteins that are found widespread in nature and includes enzymes that can catalyze various reactions in different substrates. The catalytic versatility of the ABH fold enzymes, which has been a valuable property in protein engineering applications, is based on a similar acid-base-nucleophile catalytic mechanism. In our research, we are concerned with the structure that surrounds the key units of the catalytic machinery, and we have previously found conserved structural organizations that coordinate the catalytic acid, the catalytic nucleophile and the residues of the oxyanion hole. Here, we explore the architecture that surrounds the catalytic histidine at the active sites of enzymes from 40 ABH fold families, where we have identified six conserved interactions that coordinate the catalytic histidine next to the catalytic acid and the catalytic nucleophile. Specifically, the catalytic nucleophile is coordinated next to the catalytic histidine by two weak hydrogen bonds, while the catalytic acid is directly involved in the coordination of the catalytic histidine through by two weak hydrogen bonds. The imidazole ring of the catalytic histidine is coordinated by a CH-π contact and a hydrophobic interaction. Moreover, the catalytic triad residues are connected with a residue that is located at the core of the active site of ABH fold, which is suggested to be the fourth member of a "structural catalytic tetrad". Besides their role in the stability of the catalytic mechanism, the conserved elements of the catalytic site are actively involved in ligand binding and affect other properties of the catalytic activity, such as substrate specificity, enantioselectivity, pH optimum and thermostability of ABH fold enzymes. These properties are regularly targeted in protein engineering applications, and thus, the identified conserved structural elements can serve as potential modification sites in order to develop ABH fold enzymes with altered activities.

2967 related Products with: The acid-base-nucleophile catalytic triad in ABH-fold enzymes is coordinated by a set of structural elements.

Rabbit Anti-IAA (Indole-3 Rabbit Anti-IAA (Indole-3 Rabbit Anti-IAA (Indole-3 Rabbit Anti-IAA (Indole-3 Rabbit Anti-IAA (Indole-3 Rabbit Anti-IAA (Indole-3 Rabbit Anti-IAA (Indole-3 Rabbit Anti-IAA (Indole-3 Rabbit Anti-IAA (Indole-3 Rabbit Anti-IAA (Indole-3 Rabbit Anti-IAA (Indole-3 Rabbit Anti-IAA (Indole-3

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Comparative genomic analysis of Proteus spp. isolated from tree shrews indicated unexpectedly high genetic diversity.

Proteus spp. are commensal gastrointestinal bacteria in many hosts, but information regarding the mutual relationships between these bacteria and their hosts is limited. The tree shrew is an alternative laboratory animal widely used for human disease research. However, little is known about the relationship between Proteus spp. and tree shrews. In this study, the complete genome sequencing method was used to analyse the characteristics of Proteus spp. isolated from tree shrews, and comparative genomic analysis was performed to reveal their relationships. The results showed that 36 Proteus spp. bacteria were isolated, including 34 Proteus mirabilis strains and two Proteus vulgaris strains. The effective rate of sequencing was 93.53%±2.73%, with an average GC content of 39.94%±0.25%. Briefly, 3682.89±90.37, 2771.36±36.01 and 2832.06±42.49 genes were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant nucleotide database (NR), SwissProt database and KEGG database, respectively. The high proportions of macrolide-, vancomycin-, bacitracin-, and tetracycline-resistance profiles of the strains were annotated in the Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB). Flagella, lipooligosaccharides, type 1 fimbriae and P fimbriae were the most abundantly annotated virulence factors in the Virulence Factor Database (VFDB). SNP variants indicated high proportions of base transitions (Ts), homozygous mutations (Hom) and non-synonymous mutations (Non-Syn) in Proteus spp. (P<0.05). Phylogenetic analysis of Proteus spp. and other references revealed high genetic diversity for strains isolated from tree shrews, and host specificity of Proteus spp. bacteria was not found. Overall, this study provided important information on characteristics of genome for Proteus spp. isolated from tree shrews.

1266 related Products with: Comparative genomic analysis of Proteus spp. isolated from tree shrews indicated unexpectedly high genetic diversity.

ProPrep™ Genomic XL-10 Analysis Tool for AAH-CYT CREB Phospho-Specific Arr Inflammation (Mouse) Anti Lipoproteins, Human Plasm EnzyChrom™ Kinase Assay High density (69 cases 20 Analysis Tool for AAH-CYT Insulin Receptor Phospho- StayBrite™ Highly Stabl HIGH Density NICKEL Rabbit Anti Mouse PAI1 Af

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Inter-species variation in monovalent anion substrate selectivity and inhibitor sensitivity in the sodium iodide symporter (NIS).

The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) transports iodide, which is necessary for thyroid hormone production. NIS also transports other monovalent anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF4-), pertechnetate (TcO4-), and thiocyanate (SCN-), and is competitively inhibited by perchlorate (ClO4-). However, the mechanisms of substrate selectivity and inhibitor sensitivity are poorly understood. Here, a comparative approach was taken to determine whether naturally evolved NIS proteins exhibit variability in their substrate transport properties. The NIS proteins of thirteen animal species were initially assessed, and three species from environments with differing iodide availability, freshwater species Danio rerio (zebrafish), saltwater species Balaenoptera acutorostrata scammoni (minke whale), and non-aquatic mammalian species Homo sapiens (human) were studied in detail. NIS genes from each of these species were lentivirally transduced into HeLa cells, which were then characterized using radioisotope uptake assays, 125I- competitive substrate uptake assays, and kinetic assays. Homology models of human, minke whale and zebrafish NIS were used to evaluate sequence-dependent impact on the organization of Na+ and I- binding pockets. Whereas each of the three proteins that were analyzed in detail concentrated iodide to a similar degree, their sensitivity to perchlorate inhibition varied significantly: minke whale NIS was the least impacted by perchlorate inhibition (IC50 = 4.599 μM), zebrafish NIS was highly sensitive (IC50 = 0.081 μM), and human NIS showed intermediate sensitivity (IC50 = 1.566 μM). Further studies with fifteen additional substrates and inhibitors revealed similar patterns of iodide uptake inhibition, though the degree of 125I- uptake inhibition varied with each compound. Kinetic analysis revealed whale NIS had the lowest Km-I and the highest Vmax-I. Conversely, zebrafish NIS had the highest Km and lowest Vmax. Again, human NIS was intermediate. Molecular modeling revealed a high degree of conservation in the putative ion binding pockets of NIS proteins from different species, which suggests the residues responsible for the observed differences in substrate selectivity lie elsewhere in the protein. Ongoing studies are focusing on residues in the extracellular loops of NIS as determinants of anion specificity. These data demonstrate significant transport differences between the NIS proteins of different species, which may be influenced by the unique physiological needs of each organism. Our results also identify naturally-existing NIS proteins with significant variability in substrate transport kinetics and inhibitor sensitivity, which suggest that the affinity and selectivity of NIS for certain substrates can be altered for biotechnological and clinical applications. Further examination of interspecies differences may improve understanding of the substrate transport mechanism.

2327 related Products with: Inter-species variation in monovalent anion substrate selectivity and inhibitor sensitivity in the sodium iodide symporter (NIS).



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